Linked by Thom Holwerda on Tue 5th May 2009 22:04 UTC
Ubuntu, Kubuntu, Xubuntu Many Linux users have experience with Wine, the application compatibility layer which allows some Windows programs to run on UNIX-like machines. During Ubuntu's Open Week event, Mark Shuttleworth was asked about Wine, and how important he believes it is for the success of Ubuntu.
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Comment by uaxactun
by uaxactun on Wed 6th May 2009 04:30 UTC
uaxactun
Member since:
2008-04-17

I use wine to run applications that do not have an equivalent in linux -- endnote for example. I also use wine to run ms office. This enables me to edit legacy ppt and doc files (of which i have thousands). Open office works fine with a 50K word doc but often balks with large complex ms office files (i have filed *confirmed* bugs).

Reply Score: 1

RE: Comment by uaxactun
by lemur2 on Wed 6th May 2009 05:27 in reply to "Comment by uaxactun"
lemur2 Member since:
2007-02-17

I use wine to run applications that do not have an equivalent in linux -- endnote for example.


Endnote has a few alternatives available in Linux.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Comparison_of_reference_management_sof...

Some that might be of interest:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bibus
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pybliographer

... and here is one that is a firefox extension:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Zotero

These may or may not suit you ... but nevertheless, they do exist, and they do qualify as an equivalent in Linux of endnote.

I'm getting a bit tired of endless baseless claims that one cannot do this or that natively on Linux. Quite a few people seem to be prepared to claim this without any basis, or with quite outdated information.

Edited 2009-05-06 05:28 UTC

Reply Parent Score: 1

RE[2]: Comment by uaxactun
by polaris20 on Wed 6th May 2009 14:55 in reply to "RE: Comment by uaxactun"
polaris20 Member since:
2005-07-06


I'm getting a bit tired of endless baseless claims that one cannot do this or that natively on Linux. Quite a few people seem to be prepared to claim this without any basis, or with quite outdated information.


You can get tired of it all you want, but that doesn't negate the fact that the problem exists. Native equivalents aren't always as good as the Mac or Windows app you're trying to replace. Gimp is not as good as Photoshop. Ardour is not as good as Cubase/Sonar/Pro Tools. Evolution is nowhere near as good as Outlook or even Entourage. Kino is not as good as Premiere, FCP, or even Sony Vegas. The Visio replacements aren't as good as Visio (I've tried every one of them that I could find).

Shall I go on?

Of course this is my opinion, but I bet I can find a few hundred people to agree with me.

I don't think WINE is the answer though. It doesn't encourage native ports to Linux, merely the developer "getting it to work" with WINE, which, IMO, is kind of half-assed.

Reply Parent Score: 3

RE[2]: Comment by uaxactun
by uaxactun on Wed 6th May 2009 17:51 in reply to "RE: Comment by uaxactun"
uaxactun Member since:
2008-04-17

Sorry but the software you mentioned *just does not do the things* that Endnote does. I use endnote to format references in particular journal/manuscript styles. It is possible to do this by manually using the software you mention but that defeats the purpose. (I'd rather use latex and bibtex.)

And I use zotero every day for its wonderful web snapshot/note capability but, for me, it has never worked as a bibliographic tool.

The open office bibliographic project is promising but development has been achingly slow.
_ _ _ _ _ _

I think your failure to respond to the interoperability criticism is telling. I have hundreds of legacy documents that open office either corrupts or cannot open (forms, tables, embedded images, embedded movies, proprietary ttf and ps fonts). If you want to see linux used in a professional environment, the ability to run microsoft office natively in linx is essential.

Reply Parent Score: 2