Linked by Thom Holwerda on Mon 1st Jun 2009 17:50 UTC, submitted by poundsmack
Sun Solaris, OpenSolaris The team at Sun behind OpenSolaris has unleashed OpenSolaris 2009.06 upon the world. This new release comes packed with new features, changes, improvements, and fixes, and is the first release of OpenSolaris for SPARC, adding support for UltraSPARC T1, T2 (Sun4v), and UltraSPARC II, III and IV (Sun4u). Read on for some of the improvements that stand out.
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RE[14]: Pay or run unstable
by Windows Sucks on Thu 4th Jun 2009 07:26 UTC in reply to "RE[13]: Pay or run unstable"
Windows Sucks
Member since:
2005-11-10



OpenSolaris patching/updates/upgrades/what-ever are confined within a new "boot environment" that can be activated on reboot of system. This way, if the upgrade is erroneous (e.g. from the source) then a rollback can occur and so the system is not comprised. See, if you have not figured it out yet, OpenSolaris gives you a fallback scenario. What's Linux's solution after a stuffed up upgrade/patching and no way to uninstall the erroneous software. I have experienced a failed Linux upgrade and it is not a pleasant experience especially when (unlike OpenSolaris) you cannot "flip a switch" and revert the system to a previous state. Also, these boot environments are lightweight/optimised. Even upgrading an entire installation (if need be) is a trivial task with ZFS/BootEnvironment/Rollback/etc framework.


?

To configure yum to save rollback information, add the line tsflags=repackage to /etc/yum.conf.

To configure command-line rpm to do the same thing, add the line %_repackage_all_erasures 1 to /etc/rpm/macros.

Install, erase, and update packages to your heart's content, using pup, pirut, yumex, yum, rpm, and the yum automatic update service.

If/when you want to rollback to a previous state, perform an rpm update with the --rollback option followed by a date/time specifier. Some examples: rpm -Uhv --rollback '9:00 am', rpm -Uhv --rollback '4 hours ago', rpm -Uhv --rollback 'december 25'.

This is old info I am sure it's more easy or set by default on RedHat Enterprise Linux.

Transactional Rollbacks

Early in 2002, Jeff Johnson, the current maintainer of RPM, began to remedy the rollback problem when he included the transactional rollback feature into the 4.0.3 release of RPM. This feature brought with it the promise of an automated downgrade of a set of RPMs. Like many new features, it was rough around the edges and completely undocumented, except for a few e-mails on the RPM mailing list (rpm-list@redhat.com). Over the past year and a half, transactional rollbacks have matured steadily. In the current RPM 4.2 release, which comes with Red Hat 9, transactional rollbacks are quite usable.

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE[15]: Pay or run unstable
by akrosdbay on Thu 4th Jun 2009 07:39 in reply to "RE[14]: Pay or run unstable"
akrosdbay Member since:
2008-06-09



To configure yum to save rollback information, add the line tsflags=repackage to /etc/yum.conf.

To configure command-line rpm to do the same thing, add the line %_repackage_all_erasures 1 to /etc/rpm/macros.

Install, erase, and update packages to your heart's content, using pup, pirut, yumex, yum, rpm, and the yum automatic update service.

If/when you want to rollback to a previous state, perform an rpm update with the --rollback option followed by a date/time specifier. Some examples: rpm -Uhv --rollback '9:00 am', rpm -Uhv --rollback '4 hours ago', rpm -Uhv --rollback 'december 25'.

This is old info I am sure it's more easy or set by default on RedHat Enterprise Linux.



Too complicated! On OpenSolaris it is:

beadm list
List all the Boot environments and pick one. If you already know the BE name just type the commands below.
beadm activate <be name>
reboot

Or use the GUI. Simple.

Transactional Rollbacks

Early in 2002, Jeff Johnson, the current maintainer of RPM, began to remedy the rollback problem when he included the transactional rollback feature into the 4.0.3 release of RPM. This feature brought with it the promise of an automated downgrade of a set of RPMs. Like many new features, it was rough around the edges and completely undocumented, except for a few e-mails on the RPM mailing list (rpm-list@redhat.com). Over the past year and a half, transactional rollbacks have matured steadily. In the current RPM 4.2 release, which comes with Red Hat 9, transactional rollbacks are quite usable


OpenSolaris does a file system block level rollback. Which is much safer than the package manager doing it. It is also much quicker takes a few seconds to clone (during install) and few seconds to rollback.

It works reliably already because ZFS makes it dead simple and bullet proof.

In fact I am updating my virtual box on my macbook pro install of OpenSolaris to 2009.06 right now. In fact when I was installing mac OS X 10.5.7 update I was really missing the OpenSolaris clone and update system. One can only hope snow leopard uses ZFS as effectively.

Edited 2009-06-04 07:45 UTC

Reply Parent Score: 1

RE[16]: Pay or run unstable
by tony on Thu 4th Jun 2009 17:49 in reply to "RE[15]: Pay or run unstable"
tony Member since:
2005-07-06



Too complicated! On OpenSolaris it is:

beadm list
List all the Boot environments and pick one. If you already know the BE name just type the commands below.
beadm activate
reboot

Or use the GUI. Simple.




That aspect is simpler, yes. But then again OpenSolaris won't provide free updates for the 2009.06 release, so you either need to run bleeding edge/unstable, or keep track of all the installed packages and monitor the security lists and update the packages manually. Honestly, that's really lame. Most operating systems automatically update.



It works reliably already because ZFS makes it dead simple and bullet proof.

In fact I am updating my virtual box on my macbook pro install of OpenSolaris to 2009.06 right now. In fact when I was installing mac OS X 10.5.7 update I was really missing the OpenSolaris clone and update system. One can only hope snow leopard uses ZFS as effectively.


ZFS probably won't be used in laptops, at least in its current state. It uses too much memory (1 GB recommended just for ZFS) and the checking it does runs the disk a lot, a no-no on laptops. It probably wouldn't be used on desktops either. But it'll be interesting to see.

Reply Parent Score: 1