Linked by Thom Holwerda on Mon 8th Jun 2009 18:02 UTC
Apple At the WWDC today, Apple has lifted the veil on a number of features of its upcoming operating system, Snow Leopard. Most of the work on Snow Leopard has gone into under-the-hood technologies and optimisations, but there are also a number of interface tweaks. The company also updated some of its laptops, while also lowering their prices. We got all the news from MacRumorsLive.com.
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rhetoric.sendmemoney
Member since:
2006-01-22

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The latter are service pack level adjustments. Not $29 changes. See service pack/firefox points above.


Whoa there. OpenCL as service pack level adjustment? Grand Central? Those are the kinds of things that really are grappling with where computer technology is moving. They aren't just an extra layer or piece of software. They are built in to the core along with 64-bit everything and completely rebuilt Cocoa Finder and other things. That's way bigger than silly bug fixes from a service pack.

The good thing is that Leopard is going to be running along great for PowerPC users and others who may not upgrade for years to come. Contrast that with how Microsoft is trying to put together a winner (Windows 7) after a loser (Vista). Apple is building an even stronger winner (Snow Leopard) based on a proven winner (Leopard). I wonder what would have happened if Microsoft had just developed a stronger XP in the first place.
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Careful, I was solely using Windows service packs as an example. Lets not get derailed by that wreck. I don't think it is a better solution than OSX at all. Nor is Linux. This is about Apple "not enough profit margin for a reasonably priced notebook" trying to pass a service pack off with a $29 dollar fee. A Microsoft failure has nothing to do with this.

Those changes do not present a value NOW. When the "future" features come out using them they will. RIGHT NOW they do not provide a value added benefit to the home user. Therefore they are not worth $29 to the home user. The speed gains/interface tweaks (which are not very expansive) are service pack level changes... Microsoft upgrades DirectX/Windows Search and many other similar techs in their SPs. This is hardly different.

Reply Parent Score: 0

NathanHill Member since:
2006-10-06


Careful, I was solely using Windows service packs as an example. Lets not get derailed by that wreck. I don't think it is a better solution than OSX at all. Nor is Linux. This is about Apple "not enough profit margin for a reasonably priced notebook" trying to pass a service pack off with a $29 dollar fee. A Microsoft failure has nothing to do with this.

Those changes do not present a value NOW. When the "future" features come out using them they will. RIGHT NOW they do not provide a value added benefit to the home user. Therefore they are not worth $29 to the home user. The speed gains/interface tweaks (which are not very expansive) are service pack level changes... Microsoft upgrades DirectX/Windows Search and many other similar techs in their SPs. This is hardly different.


I think we just disagree then. I see this as huge possible improvements in functionality and end user delight. I am an end user, and I think Snow Leopard looks great, especially because of the little things that it will do better.

Apple has resisted doing 32-bit and 64-bit lines of their OS like most others (Linux and Windows). One could look at Snow Leopard as the introduction of their 64-bit OS with other advancements. So these are not service pack level changes - since when in Windows can you upgrade from 32-bit OS to 64-bit OS with some service packs? You can't do that in Linux either. Your logic is flawed, bro.

Snow Leopard is a whole new mutation of Leopard. I'm really happy with Leopard at home on my Powermac G4, but I am even more excited to purchase a new Mac in September now.

Reply Parent Score: 2

rhetoric.sendmemoney Member since:
2006-01-22


I think we just disagree then. I see this as huge possible improvements in functionality and end user delight. I am an end user, and I think Snow Leopard looks great, especially because of the little things that it will do better.

Apple has resisted doing 32-bit and 64-bit lines of their OS like most others (Linux and Windows). One could look at Snow Leopard as the introduction of their 64-bit OS with other advancements. So these are not service pack level changes - since when in Windows can you upgrade from 32-bit OS to 64-bit OS with some service packs? You can't do that in Linux either. Your logic is flawed, bro.


Tell that Grandma you got switched over to Mac 'cause its easier then windows' about all that and I bet the reaction is 'meh.' My logic isn't flawed at all, you keep assuming that I think Windows is better - I don't. Just because you drink the magic kool-aid doesn't make it interesting to the rest of us. Please tell me what all these great changes are - I don't see any in the feature list. The 64bit/Cocoa changes have NO value to the customer... they may an update from now, but this service pack is not worth $29 to most people. Get the next version and save yourself $29.

Reply Parent Score: 2