Linked by Thom Holwerda on Tue 16th Jun 2009 13:25 UTC
Apple During last week's Worldwide Developers Conference, Apple introduced a new iPhone model, the iPhone 3GS, which comes, among other things, with a faster processor and more RAM. Since this is a developers' conference, there were also numerous sessions on iPhone development, and the last session was about publishing on the App Store. Since every session at every WWDC is always followed by an open Q&A session, you'd figure this'd be the perfect opportunity for iPhone developers to ask about Apple's App Store policies. Well, no.
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RE: what a sharp contrast
by fretinator on Tue 16th Jun 2009 14:11 UTC in reply to "what a sharp contrast"
fretinator
Member since:
2005-07-06

I am primarily a Linux dude, but I have also been employed as a Windows developer (VC++, VB Classic, C#, etc). One thing Microsoft has always done well is treat their developer community well. The ISV's are the heart and soul of the Microsoft platform. The only time I remember them mis-treating their developer community was when they axed VB classic. VB.Net is NOT a successor to VB6, it is a totally different platform. They totally dis-respected their VB community.

However, when you decide to do the dance with companies like Apple and Microsoft, you knew who was in control. IMHO, Apple is a MUCH more closed company than Microsoft. I feel like when you buy an Apple product that they are merely "renting" it to you - even the computer itself.

Go Android! Go Moblin!

Reply Parent Score: 10

v RE[2]: what a sharp contrast
by kaiwai on Tue 16th Jun 2009 14:21 in reply to "RE: what a sharp contrast"
RE[3]: what a sharp contrast
by Tuishimi on Tue 16th Jun 2009 14:32 in reply to "RE[2]: what a sharp contrast"
Tuishimi Member since:
2005-07-06

Ouch!

Reply Parent Score: 1

RE[3]: what a sharp contrast
by fretinator on Tue 16th Jun 2009 14:39 in reply to "RE[2]: what a sharp contrast"
fretinator Member since:
2005-07-06

Perky bunds, stop the whining. Microsoft told you over 1 year before shutting off the valve to VB Classic that it was going to come to an end - get with the programme and upskill yourself.


I had no problem moving on - I was already a Java and Visual C++ developer, so C# and VB.Net are much more preferable languages for me. I was taking about some of the "VB Guys" out there who struggled with OOP ,which wasn't necessary with VB6. Even when I did VB6, I did it in a very Object-oriented way. I had a full framework of classes for each application - I very much prefer an MVC development style.

Sometimes it is ok to feel compassionate towards the struggle of other, even if you do not struggle with it. That's why I am glad that Microsoft is creating Smallbasic:

http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/devlabs/cc950524.aspx

Reply Parent Score: 3

RE[3]: what a sharp contrast
by JAlexoid on Tue 16th Jun 2009 21:56 in reply to "RE[2]: what a sharp contrast"
JAlexoid Member since:
2009-05-19

Where is it closed; I purchase a Mac and about the only thing different is the fact that it uses an EFI firmware and the operating system is Mac OS X (and only works on Mac's). For all intents and purposes, it is a bog standard PC which you can throw Linux, *BSD, OpenSolaris, Windows or what have you on it. Nothing stops you from leaving the ecosystem - this 'closed system' is a load of crap. The Mac is no more closed than the average PC - the BIOS is proprietary, the chipset is proprietary, the CPU for christ sake is proprietary, so cry me a bloody river why don't you.


Do you know what the word "context" means? There is no issue with reusing the same H/W for different purposes. There is however an issue with working on that platform. Witch is essentially the most closed off platform out there. And platform means both hardware AND software.
And RTFA for more evidence that Apple is closed off.
As another piece of evidence, they whined and bitched about supporting Java, and look at how they treat it afterwards... Updates are late, bugs unpatched, versions are unavailable for products that are 3 years old and so on...

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE[3]: what a sharp contrast
by frood on Wed 17th Jun 2009 16:55 in reply to "RE[2]: what a sharp contrast"
frood Member since:
2005-07-06

That's when people talk about developing for "Mac" or "PC" they mean the OSX or Windows operating systems respectively.

Reply Parent Score: 1

RE[2]: what a sharp contrast
by SlackerJack on Tue 16th Jun 2009 16:37 in reply to "RE: what a sharp contrast"
SlackerJack Member since:
2005-11-12

Well yes actually you do. The iPhone doesn't belong to whoever buys it, you're merely rent it. It's the same for their OS's as well, you license it off them rather than own it.

It's a known fact these proprietary companies do such things,(Apple in this case) since you give away your rights and freedom agreeing to their licenses.

Reply Parent Score: 3

RE[3]: what a sharp contrast
by dragossh on Tue 16th Jun 2009 17:27 in reply to "RE[2]: what a sharp contrast"
dragossh Member since:
2008-12-16

You’re not giving away anything. No company can take your rights away.

You don’t rent the iPhone, you buy a unit of it. Be it subsidized or not. Likewise, you don’t license the OS, you buy a copy of it and you can do whatever you want with it since it’s your propriety. I can use the OS X DVD to cut cheese or tear the DVD apart if I want.

Don’t be fooled into this “we license it to you” BS that companies want you to believe. You sure don’t license a car or a book, why should it be any different for gadgets or software?

Reply Parent Score: 4

RE[3]: what a sharp contrast
by JAlexoid on Tue 16th Jun 2009 21:59 in reply to "RE[2]: what a sharp contrast"
JAlexoid Member since:
2009-05-19

Rent it? Really?
Why do we, in Europe, buy it unsubsidized and still get treated as people who buy it subsidized(per your definition synonymous to rented)?

Reply Parent Score: 0

RE[2]: what a sharp contrast
by google_ninja on Tue 16th Jun 2009 21:50 in reply to "RE: what a sharp contrast"
google_ninja Member since:
2006-02-05

VB.net is not a successor to VB6, but it is heavily inspired by it.

The thing with VB6 is that it was a horrible mess from both a syntax and an API point of view that you sorta just had to memorize to get anything done in. VB.net is a far better designed platform, and I can't think of a single thing that was removed. I think the big problem was that VB devs were forced to up their game, and really learn OO concepts, which they didn't want to do.

Reply Parent Score: 2