Linked by Thom Holwerda on Tue 30th Jun 2009 15:56 UTC
Mozilla & Gecko clones As was anticipated, the boys and girls at Mozilla have released the final build of Firefox 3.5 today. Firefox 3.5 - originally supposed to be 3.1 - comes with many welcome improvements, chief among which is support for HTML5 audio and video tags.
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Kroc
Member since:
2005-11-10

QuickTime plays the video, not Safari. Firefox is the only released browser with the video decoder built in (Chrome 3 will be the second).

Safari’s <video> is still a plugin of sorts, and having to install XiphQT is hardly and out-of-the-box experience.

Reply Parent Score: 2

daveak Member since:
2008-12-29

They don't mention out of the box ;) besides, installing a codec is less than installing a whole browser such as firefox so it is less to do.

Even though it is using quicktime, it is still the browser supporting it + it still seems native (and seeming native is something firefox loves to try and do), for instance right click on the video you do not get a quicktime popup like you would with flash, but just the normal one. Personally I think it is better going though the native media system, why should my browser know how to decode any video format? Yes it is nicer the browser renders it rather than farming off to a plugin, but it should still use the system code, not bring in its own library. Cross platform argument? Just ship the codec for whatever framework the platform build is.

Reply Parent Score: 1

ggeldenhuys Member since:
2006-11-13

installing a codec is less than installing a whole browser such as firefox so it is less to do.

Well if you start of with the browser as default - which should be the case in the next Linux distro release, then it's one less codec to install! Less effort for the end-user and the web developers.

just the normal one. Personally I think it is better going though the native media system, why should my browser know how to decode any video format?

Well, that's like saying you would rather require external add-ons or codecs before your browser supports loading jpg, gif and png images. HTML5 wants video and audio to be just as natural as the current image format support - all out of the box experience and supported by all.

This also makes it much easier for web developers. They can now add more content to there websites knowing that users will be able to experience it as the web developer/designer intended.

Reply Parent Score: 1

arpan Member since:
2006-07-30

Does it really matter whether it is Safari playing the video or Quicktime. Either way, it is transparent to the user.

In addition, which codec is more likely to be used, h.264 or Theora? I know that h.264 is patent encumbered, but when so many companies have already paid the fees and use it extensively, does it not make sense to standardize on that?

I'm not saying I don't want Theora to win, I'm just saying that that isn't all that likely to happen. As such, would it not make sense to standardize on something that have a much better chance of becoming a defacto standard for the web and replacing proprietary Flash or Silverlight?

Reply Parent Score: 1

Kroc Member since:
2005-11-10

I think you’re forgetting that Firefox is the second most used browser, period. This matters to 25% of the world, and over 50% in some countries. Safari has a few meager percentage points. There will be more people using Theora by the end of this week, then people use Safari.

And there’s bollox-all innovation going on in the Internet Explorer camp. Theora is well on it’s way to becoming signifcantly important.

Reply Parent Score: 2

ggeldenhuys Member since:
2006-11-13

In addition, which codec is more likely to be used, h.264 or Theora? I know that h.264 is patent encumbered, but when so many companies have already paid the fees and use it extensively, does it not make sense to standardize on that?


No, because who is going to pay the licensing fees for all the other platforms (excluding Apple and Windows)? What about OS's like Linux, *BSD, ReactOS, BEOS, OS/2, ..... Theora is free to all, so everybody can enjoy the internet as it was intended by the web designers. Theora improves with encoding quality at every release, and for web quality (which is much lower than when you rip your favorite DVD collection) that is not a issue anyway. Also Theora has better streaming support as far as I know.

Reply Parent Score: 4