Linked by Thom Holwerda on Wed 15th Jul 2009 21:38 UTC
OSNews, Generic OSes It's time for another "OSNews asks" item. This time, I want to focus on something that I've been wanting to talk about with you all before, but never found the time for. The question is simple: which feature(s) from other operating systems would you like to see in your own main operating system?
Thread beginning with comment 373615
To view parent comment, click here.
To read all comments associated with this story, please click here.
poladark
Member since:
2009-07-15

A simpler and more universal solution than Git would be keeping old versions of files with a version number like in OpenVMS. It's very handy for day-to-day operation of the operating system even if you're not working on a project.

The lack of built-in version handling like in OpenVMS is one of my major grievances with all other operating systems. It's a simple solution to a very common problem.

Reply Parent Score: 1

phoenix Member since:
2005-07-11

A simpler and more universal solution than Git would be keeping old versions of files with a version number like in OpenVMS. It's very handy for day-to-day operation of the operating system even if you're not working on a project.

The lack of built-in version handling like in OpenVMS is one of my major grievances with all other operating systems. It's a simple solution to a very common problem.


In theory, it shouldn't be too hard to add this to ZFS and btrFS, as these are Copy-on-Write filesystems. Nothing is ever overwritten. All they need to do is come up with a way to expose the old version of the file instead of marking those blocks as "not in use". The snapshot code in ZFS, for example, probably does 90% of the work for this.

Reply Parent Score: 2

Kebabbert Member since:
2007-07-27

Actually OpenSolaris has already that feature, versioning of the entire system. For users you have "Time Machine" taking regular snapshots of your entire user directory - allowing you to rollback whenever you want.

For Operating system, OpenSolaris has something called "Boot Environment" (BE) that is just a Snapshot of "/". Before installing a program you create a snapshot and if you dont like the program, you just boot in GRUB to the old install and destroy the snapshot. Before you apply a patch, OpenSolaris automatically makes a snapshot and then patches. If you dont like the patch, you just boot into your old install via GRUB. All BEs are automatically listed in GRUB, so you can boot into any BE you want. And delete any you want. You can have a "unstable" OpenSolaris branch where you try and test everything. And when you are satisfied you just install it to your real install.

Here is a discussion on Nexenta (which is Ubuntu + OpenSolaris kernel, that is; ZFS, DTrace, etc)
http://foss-boss.blogspot.com/search?updated-min=2008-01-01T00%...

Reply Parent Score: 2