Linked by Jordan Spencer Cunningham on Tue 8th Sep 2009 21:21 UTC, submitted by wakeupneo
Microsoft According to a leak from a BestBuy employee, Microsoft is initiating a sort of "Anti-Linux Training" course for the employees, and those who take part in the said training are rewarded with a copy of Windows 7 for only ten dollars. The leaked screenshots of the campaign show Microsoft's comparison of its own system with an obscure "Linux" and how Windows is better in every way including security, "free downloads", and software and hardware compatibility.
Thread beginning with comment 382990
To view parent comment, click here.
To read all comments associated with this story, please click here.
RE: Education
by Ultimatebadass on Wed 9th Sep 2009 08:26 UTC in reply to "Education"
Ultimatebadass
Member since:
2006-01-08

One of the most annoying things about Windows is how invasive it's updating process is when it comes to timely startups and shutdowns. Linux is light years ahead of it in this respect.


Exactly how invasive? You just set it to "Check for updates but let me choose when to download & install" and you can update whenever you have time to do so. How is that different from updates that occur every so often on linux distros with a similar auto-update tools?

Reply Parent Score: 1

RE[2]: Education
by ngaio on Wed 9th Sep 2009 15:47 in reply to "RE: Education"
ngaio Member since:
2005-10-06

"One of the most annoying things about Windows is how invasive it's updating process is when it comes to timely startups and shutdowns. Linux is light years ahead of it in this respect.


Exactly how invasive? You just set it to "Check for updates but let me choose when to download & install" and you can update whenever you have time to do so. How is that different from updates that occur every so often on linux distros with a similar auto-update tools?
"

It's very different. When Windows installs its updates and asks you to reboot, it modifies the shutdown and startup sequences. How much they are lengthened can vary from slightly irritating to highly annoying. And there is no warning as to how long it will take. And it can take a looooooong time. This is especially bad when you're on a laptop and you just want to shutdown and leave.

Whereas in Linux it is far better. Not only is it rare to need to reboot after an update, the entire installation takes place quickly and efficiently while you are working. You may have to reboot if the kernel was updated, but its always the same (fast) shutdown and startup sequence you normally expect.

This is a huge usability win for Linux.

Reply Parent Score: 1

RE[2]: Education
by boldingd on Wed 9th Sep 2009 16:35 in reply to "RE: Education"
boldingd Member since:
2009-02-19

Heh, my petty complaint; it's hard to get Windows to leave you alone when it's found updates. This can be a pain if you just want to play a half-hour of Team Fortress 2 before going to bed. A little notification will pop up every, erm, half-hour or so, which minimizes your game every time. On my hardware, maximizing a D3D app (i.e. TF2) again takes almost 30 seconds, and doesn't always succeed, and can cause stability problems and graphical glitches (I'm on Vista, with ATI hardware). And then, if you let it download the update (or you've set it to download and install automatically), it will start trying to make you reboot; that's also really annoying, if you've managed to get a high-demand slot on a crowded server, that you may not be able to get back in to if you log out to reboot.
AFAIK, you can't tell the update agent to leave you alone completely; it'll always raise those notifications every so often.
Heh, one final gripe; I really don't like that the update agent runs in the background, because it makes the whole update process take longer. I'd much rather have it use as many system resources as it needs and finish quickly, than have it take half my bandwidth or a quarter my bandwidth (and, at some point, generate lots of disk I/O) and nag-force a reboot after two hours. But again, that's largely because of my PC-gamer usage patterns.

Reply Parent Score: 1

RE[2]: Education - manual
by jabbotts on Wed 9th Sep 2009 18:55 in reply to "RE: Education"
jabbotts Member since:
2007-09-06

My preference is to set the Windows Update fully off and visit the website when I choose too. When I go, I know there are updates waiting and have read the outcome of installing them through Internet Storm Center and similar sites.

I also go a step further and include the Windows Update service in my .cmd files that stop and start services. No reason to leave it consuming resources between patch tuesdays and it's a quick double-click to enable the three or so required services when I do choose to update.

Reply Parent Score: 2