Linked by Thom Holwerda on Wed 25th Nov 2009 17:57 UTC
Ubuntu, Kubuntu, Xubuntu At the Ubuntu Developer Summit, which took place last week, it was announced that the next release of the Ubuntu Linux distribution, version 10.04, will no longer carry the GIMP in its default installation. This actually touches upon somethin I've been wanting to talk about, a problem that plagues both Linux and Mac OS X: Paint.NET is Windows-only.
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Why do we need any paint program
by bingojed on Wed 25th Nov 2009 20:48 UTC
bingojed
Member since:
2009-11-25

There are a growing number of online image editors that have much better interfaces than Gimp, and near the power of Photoshop.

If you've never tried sumopaint.com, you'd be really amazed at how well it works. The interface is spot on.

The Gimp, besides a dumb name, has an absolutely horrible interface. I use PhotoShop all the time without difficulty, but I struggle to do many basic tasks in the Gimp. I'm not sure how anyone could say that The Gimp is for professional users when they don't support high color pallets or even simple primitives like circles (and don't tell me about using the select tool to create a circle, how dumb is that).

InkScape is a perfect example of how an open source program can effectively compete against its commercial counterpart - I find its interface better than Illustrators.

Anyway, try sumopaint or one of its online brethren. Pretty nifty!

Reply Score: 2

CrLf Member since:
2006-01-03

I never did understand the recurring criticisms about the GIMP's interface. It is oriented for editing multiple images on a system with virtual desktops available. And it's not Photoshop, but if you want Photoshop or can't take five minutes to learn something else (without kicking and screaming all the way through it), then just stick with Photoshop.

As for Inkscape, I never used it, so I can't say if it's good or not (I assume it is). But as first impressions go, I started it the other day and was startled by the sheer number of toolbars it shows in the default configuration. It looked like Autocad from the late 90's.

I just find the double standards intriguing.

Reply Parent Score: 4

bingojed Member since:
2009-11-25

I think your reply is contradicted by itself. Quote: "I never did understand the recurring criticisms about the GIMP's interface."

Obviously, if it has reoccurring criticisms, it has an issue.

Just about any paint program I've ever used, Paint Shop Plus, Corel PhotoPaint, SumoPaint, Paint.Net, Deluxe Paint IV, Neo Paint, Degas, MS Paint, Elements, etc, have all much more intuitive and clean interfaces than The Gimp, as well as generally being more powerful. The Gimp's interface is an example of obstinate developers - the same kind that keep "reply below the quote" and "place my signature below the quote" default in Thunderbird. What other program in the history of paint programs requires you to use a filter on a select tool to draw a circle? Where's the polygonal select?

Reply Parent Score: 2

bousozoku Member since:
2006-01-23


...
As for Inkscape, I never used it, so I can't say if it's good or not (I assume it is). But as first impressions go, I started it the other day and was startled by the sheer number of toolbars it shows in the default configuration. It looked like Autocad from the late 90's.

I just find the double standards intriguing.


Inkscape is for vector graphics, not for raster graphics, at least the last time I used it. It's not bad but has generated so many errors on export that I don't bother with it any longer.

Reply Parent Score: 2