Linked by Thom Holwerda on Thu 26th Nov 2009 00:09 UTC, submitted by Cytor
Mozilla & Gecko clones A few days ago, we heard about Microsoft planning to include Direct2D acceleration in the yet-to-come IE9, thus leveraging today's poweful GPUs to render web content. Mozilla didn't fall behind: last Sunday, Firefox hacker Bas Schouten revealed a build of Firefox 3.7 with built-in Direct2D acceleration on his blog. His performance tests claim that popular sites like Facebook and Twitter render twice as fast compared to Firefox without Direct2D rendering. More complex sites do not see a lot of benefits, tough. This build requires DirectX 10 and a WDDM 1.0 compatible graphics drive, and thus, Windows Vista or 7. Download it here.
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Comment by kap1
by kap1 on Thu 26th Nov 2009 00:16 UTC
kap1
Member since:
2006-05-12

if I were MS, I'd keep any killer new IE features quiet until closer to the release, the firefox team are just gonna 1 up every time they announce something like this.

Reply Score: 2

RE: Comment by kap1
by Delgarde on Thu 26th Nov 2009 00:32 in reply to "Comment by kap1"
Delgarde Member since:
2008-08-19

if I were MS, I'd keep any killer new IE features quiet until closer to the release, the firefox team are just gonna 1 up every time they announce something like this.


Yeah, but they can't win on that, since they're simultaneously being criticised for being too secretive, and not letting web developers know what to expect...

Reply Parent Score: 5

RE: Comment by kap1
by n4cer on Thu 26th Nov 2009 02:13 in reply to "Comment by kap1"
n4cer Member since:
2005-07-06

if I were MS, I'd keep any killer new IE features quiet until closer to the release, the firefox team are just gonna 1 up every time they announce something like this.


It's an overall win for Windows. While IE team may have liked to be first to release with a feature like D2D acceleration, the announcement/demonstration of such support has resulted in greater adoption of the new API. Hopefully, more devs will make the jump for similarly modern APIs where it makes sense for their apps.

Now where's Firefox's DirectWrite support (and protected mode)? :-)

Heh, that's one down:
http://www.basschouten.com/blog1.php/2009/10/27/font-rendering-gdi-...

Edited 2009-11-26 02:22 UTC

Reply Parent Score: 3

RE[2]: Comment by kap1
by Alex Forster on Thu 26th Nov 2009 03:44 in reply to "RE: Comment by kap1"
Alex Forster Member since:
2005-08-12

It uses it! Or, if not the layout manager, than at least the new text rendering.

Latest Stable Firefox on Windows 7-

http://img134.imageshack.us/img134/4937/regularfirefox.png

This Minefield build using Direct2d and, as it turns out, DirectWrite-

http://img205.imageshack.us/img205/5014/direct2dfirefox.png

This is absolutely a huge win for Windows. It's easily the most exciting feature about Windows 7 for me. I can't wait to see this replace GDI.

Edited 2009-11-26 03:45 UTC

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE[2]: Comment by kap1
by kaiwai on Thu 26th Nov 2009 12:41 in reply to "RE: Comment by kap1"
kaiwai Member since:
2005-07-06

It's an overall win for Windows. While IE team may have liked to be first to release with a feature like D2D acceleration, the announcement/demonstration of such support has resulted in greater adoption of the new API. Hopefully, more devs will make the jump for similarly modern APIs where it makes sense for their apps.

Now where's Firefox's DirectWrite support (and protected mode)? :-)

Heh, that's one down:
http://www.basschouten.com/blog1.php/2009/10/27/font-rendering-gdi-...


If Microsoft wishes for greater use of Direct2D/DirectWrite then they should start moving their common controls (and other widgets) across to using Direct2D/DirectWrite so that GDI's only function in the operating system is for backwards compatibility only with all parts of the operating system employing the new API. Until that happens developers are going to look at Microsoft, look at their underutilisation of Direct2D/DirectWrite and ask themselves "why even bother, Microsoft can't even be bothered utilising, why should we?"

Edited 2009-11-26 12:42 UTC

Reply Parent Score: 3

RE: Comment by kap1
by flanque on Thu 26th Nov 2009 11:18 in reply to "Comment by kap1"
flanque Member since:
2005-12-15

How will that work with Linux and other OS flavours?

Reply Parent Score: 3

RE[2]: Comment by kap1
by segedunum on Fri 27th Nov 2009 01:06 in reply to "RE: Comment by kap1"
segedunum Member since:
2005-07-06

It won't. Be in no doubt that Firefox is a first and foremost a Windows application.

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE: Comment by kap1
by Lennie on Sun 29th Nov 2009 13:29 in reply to "Comment by kap1"
Lennie Member since:
2007-09-22

Actually the Firefox developers were already busy with this before Microsoft announced their IE9 plans.

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE: Comment by kap1
by lilsim89 on Mon 30th Nov 2009 11:35 in reply to "Comment by kap1"
lilsim89 Member since:
2009-11-30

That's what they want you to think! Now Microsoft can rip off the peer-reviewed open-source code and hope no one notices.

(Or that's just the way I would do it anyways... ;-)

Reply Parent Score: 1