Linked by snydeq on Wed 16th Dec 2009 20:13 UTC
OSNews, Generic OSes InfoWorld's Randall Kennedy takes an in-depth look at VMware Workstation 7, VirtualBox 3.1, and Parallels Desktop 4, three technologies at the heart of 'the biggest shake-up for desktop virtualization in years.' The shake-up, which sees Microsoft's once promising Virtual PC off in the Windows 7 XP Mode weeds, has put VirtualBox -- among the best free open source software available for Windows -- out front as a general-purpose VM, filling the void left by VMware's move to make Workstation more appealing to developers and admins. Meanwhile, Parallels finally offers a Desktop for Windows on par with its Mac product, as well as Workstation 4 Extreme, which delivers near native performance for graphics, disk, and network I/O.
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I've given up on Parallels
by fretinator on Wed 16th Dec 2009 22:25 UTC
fretinator
Member since:
2005-07-06

I've given up on Parallels. I purchased 2 licenses for Version 2. It would not keep up with kernel changes for Ubuntu - even if you stayed with the LTS version (Ubuntu 8.04). Every kernel update would break it, and eventually they stopped breaking it. THis was even though Canonical sold it in their store!!

Then version 4 came out - I bought the upgrade. It worked when I had Ubuntu 9.04, but it stopped working with 9.10, and I've never been able to get it working again since.

When Parallels works, it is a nice product. It's just too unstable and poorly supported. IF they can get enough funds to properly support it, it could be a good product - certainly the price is right.

From what I gather, the Mac version is better, but I do not have a Mac to test that out - just from looking at the forums.

Reply Score: 2

RE: I've given up on Parallels
by chekr on Thu 17th Dec 2009 01:22 in reply to "I've given up on Parallels"
chekr Member since:
2005-11-05

Every kernel update would break it, and eventually they stopped breaking it. THis was even though Canonical sold it in their store!!


Another example of why Linux' total disregard for stable interfaces is bad for users and vendors

Reply Parent Score: 8

3rdalbum Member since:
2008-05-26

"Every kernel update would break it, and eventually they stopped breaking it. THis was even though Canonical sold it in their store!!


Another example of why Linux' total disregard for stable interfaces is bad for users and vendors
"

DKMS. You don't need a stable interface.

The article kept going on and on about how Virtualbox is free - but the open-source edition doesn't have all the bells and whistles, and the proprietary edition is NOT free if you're using it in enterprise. The article was about enterprise.

Reply Parent Score: 3

bannor99 Member since:
2005-09-15

I've heard arguments both for and against a stable ABI and I don't think the current model helps end-users.

I wonder if it would be possible to stabilize it peridoically, say twice a year.

Reply Parent Score: 1

SamAskani Member since:
2006-01-03

Vmware Player has come a long way to handle the changes in the kernel and now it is quite pleasant. In earlier versions, you needed to "reinstall" manually the player (basically recompile the virtual devices and plug them into the running kernel).
Now, in the latest version, when you start the player it detects that the kernel changed and recompiles/plugs the devices in the fly. It just takes a few extra seconds than usual and it only happens when a new kernel is installed.

I think vmware nailed it nicely and made the extra effort to give the final user a consistent and polished solution.

Reply Parent Score: 3

gilboa Member since:
2005-07-06

I could point out that the Linux kernel was never designed to support out-of-tree modules - let alone proprietary modules.
I could also point out that a large number of proprietary kernel driver developers have learned to live with this by-design limitation, and by designing their modules with distinct kernel-interfacing-layer (as opposed to calling the kernel API from 10,000 different places), managed to reduce the changes required after each new upstream release. *

... But given that fact that your short comment had more-or-less nothing to do with the subject at hand (the problem might have had nothing to do with upstream kernel API changes and everything to do with sloppy package maintainer in the Ubuntu side or problematic driver building script on parallel's side - I have no idea [but neither do you...]), I can only assume that were simply trolling. Oh well...

- Gilboa
* Personal experience.

Edited 2009-12-18 00:58 UTC

Reply Parent Score: 2

Laurence Member since:
2007-03-26


Another example of why Linux' total disregard for stable interfaces is bad for users and vendors


Parallels isn't a Linux product and you can't blame Linux if the kernel breaks Parallels when it's supposed to be transparent to the OS (just like every other VM product is)

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE: I've given up on Parallels
by thavith_osn on Thu 17th Dec 2009 01:23 in reply to "I've given up on Parallels"
thavith_osn Member since:
2005-07-11

I'm not sure what happened with //'s and the PC version, but it always seemed to be great on the Mac. I have Ubuntu 9.10 running like a bought one on //'s 5 now, right down to wobbly window effects and all. I think Linux always seemed to be a second class citizen in the VM world their for a while. I guess it makes sense, you want to get Windows working first I guess...

I am glad to hear they have updated the Windows version, might be worth checking out.

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE: I've given up on Parallels
by nt_jerkface on Fri 18th Dec 2009 06:30 in reply to "I've given up on Parallels"
nt_jerkface Member since:
2009-08-26

It would not keep up with kernel changes for Ubuntu - even if you stayed with the LTS version (Ubuntu 8.04). Every kernel update would break it, and eventually they stopped breaking it.


VMware and Virtualbox have also been broken by kernel updates.

But the problem has nothing to do with Linux failing to provide a stable interface for third parties. Since we all know Linux is perfect in its design there must be another answer.

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE: I've given up on Parallels
by rockwell on Fri 18th Dec 2009 15:08 in reply to "I've given up on Parallels"
rockwell Member since:
2005-09-13

So ... the only OS you had a problem with using Parallels is Ubuntu, which kept crashing Parallels.

And this is Parallel's fault.

Got it.

Reply Parent Score: 3

fretinator Member since:
2005-07-06

So ... the only OS you had a problem with using Parallels is Ubuntu, which kept crashing Parallels. And this is Parallel's fault. Got it.

Yes, because Ubuntu is an explicitly supported platform.

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE: I've given up on Parallels
by fretinator on Sun 20th Dec 2009 05:01 in reply to "I've given up on Parallels"
fretinator Member since:
2005-07-06

Well, time to chew on my shoe a bit - I went out and downloaded the latest update to Parallels and it started up fine on Ubuntu 9.10. Whatever was wrong seems to have been fixed. I'll run it for a while and see how it goes.

Reply Parent Score: 2