Linked by Kroc Camen on Fri 1st Jan 2010 15:36 UTC
Opera Software HTML5 Video is coming to Opera 10.5. Yesterday (or technically, last year--happy new year readers!) Opera released a new alpha build containing a preview of their HTML5 Video support. There's a number of details to note, not least that this is still an early alpha...
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RE[4]: Comment by cerbie
by cerbie on Mon 4th Jan 2010 00:52 UTC in reply to "RE[3]: Comment by cerbie"
cerbie
Member since:
2006-01-02

"It is not false. It used to be the case that h264 was well ahead of Theora in performance, but recent advances in Theora have seen it catch up."

It is false. Nvidia, Intel, AMD, Imagination, and Broadcom, just off the top of my head have H.264 offloading in designs with their names on them. You can give a nice GPU (and drivers, and playback software) to an Atom to get flawless 1080P H.264 playback. Theora has some Google Summer of Code entires doing it on an individual level.

It's not an easy hurdle to get over, though if a, "everyone pays for every product, and every use of that product," license system goes into effect, it may have a chance.

Edited 2010-01-04 00:54 UTC

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE[5]: Comment by cerbie
by wumip on Mon 4th Jan 2010 06:02 in reply to "RE[4]: Comment by cerbie"
wumip Member since:
2009-08-20

Nvidia, Intel, AMD, Imagination, and Broadcom, just off the top of my head have H.264 offloading in designs with their names on them.

Good for H.264! Since doing the same for Theora is absolutely free, and since it is in the intersest of some of the biggest tech companies in the world (Google, Vodafone, Sony, etc.), Theora will be supported by hardware soon enough.

Reply Parent Score: 1

RE[6]: Comment by cerbie
by cerbie on Mon 4th Jan 2010 06:55 in reply to "RE[5]: Comment by cerbie"
cerbie Member since:
2006-01-02

It's no good if no one uses it, though. It's also no good if it is a moving target, which is a problem for many FOSS projects. H.264 was pretty much guaranteed wide use, and the format was set in stone some years ago, which is how it got to where it is.

As long as it stays in such wide use, it will be the one to choose. Even as royalties start hitting, the availability of H.264-enabled hardware and software will help keep it going.

It may not cost royalties, but it is not going to be free as in beer to add Theora support. If they get too greedy, though, it could happen. Not because Theora is, "free," but because H.264 would become too expensive.

Having a totally free initial period is not going to be good, if they turn around and start charging everyone, even if it's a nickel here and dime there.

Reply Parent Score: 2