Linked by Andrew Hudson on Tue 23rd Feb 2010 00:23 UTC
BeOS & Derivatives What's that you say? You made a New Year's resolution but haven't kept it? You vowed to sharpen your programming skills, write a cool application, AND use cutting edge operating system technology? Look no further, you have come to the right place. This article will get you started writing applications for Haiku, the open source version of the advanced BeOS operating system.
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All very nice...
by Delgarde on Tue 23rd Feb 2010 03:05 UTC
Delgarde
Member since:
2008-08-19

...but as far as I can see, a few rather fundamental things missing. My system is hardly new - about two-three years old - but it doesn't look like much of it will work. Multi-core processors, for example - recent forum posts indicate that even in 2010, that's considered too new a feature to be well supported. WiFi support - standard on pretty much any laptop for the past five+ years - is dubbed experimental. My video card (nVidia, but ATI/AMD is in the same position) is supported only by a Vesa driver.

Seems to me that for all that it might have a great design and user interaction, that doesn't matter so long as it's so massively deficient in hardware support. I'd be happy to try it out, but as far as I can tell, I'd be doing well if it boots. And if it does, I won't be able to do anything with it in the absence of an internet connection...

Reply Score: 0

RE: All very nice...
by bryanv on Tue 23rd Feb 2010 03:09 in reply to "All very nice..."
bryanv Member since:
2005-08-26

What are you blathering about?

Did you even try a build of Haiku on your hardware?

*posted from a Dell Latitude D620, Core DUO, that happily boots Haiku, and uses _both_ cores beautifully thank you very much*

Reply Parent Score: 4

RE[2]: All very nice...
by Delgarde on Tue 23rd Feb 2010 03:33 in reply to "RE: All very nice..."
Delgarde Member since:
2008-08-19

What are you blathering about?

Did you even try a build of Haiku on your hardware?


No, because the information I can find on their website suggests there's not much point. Perhaps it's incorrect, but my comments were based on recent (i.e this year) posts in their forums indicating that while traditional SMP worked fine, multi-core didn't. Likewise, my comments about WiFi or video support come from the Haiku site and forums.

If their hardware support is better than I thought, perhaps they need to make it clearer what the current state of things is...

Reply Parent Score: 5

RE: All very nice...
by Bruno on Tue 23rd Feb 2010 03:19 in reply to "All very nice..."
Bruno Member since:
2005-07-13

Let's see: I have a Intel Core 2 Quad Extreme at home where I run Haiku. I also have an 8 core (4 physical + 4 hyperthreading) laptop that runs it. All cores are used as expected. I guess you may want to get your facts straight.

Reply Parent Score: 3

RE: All very nice...
by looncraz on Tue 23rd Feb 2010 03:41 in reply to "All very nice..."
looncraz Member since:
2005-07-24

BeOS supported 'n' CPUs, Haiku had the same aim.

Even BeOS can take advantage of however many CPU cores are available, provided it can support the chipset / memory.

From what I hear wireless works very well, but is not tested well enough to consider it anything more than experimental.

Also, before you judge a complex project such as an operating system, one should always consider how long it took the competition to attain the same level of completeness they are expecting.

For Windows, that would be 10 years for wireless, and then only because companies other than Microsoft did the work. Otherwise, you can move that all of the way up to 14 years ( XP ) - and that is with very poor inbuilt hardware support. But Microsoft need only worry about having the kernel boot and remain stable enough for 3rd party drivers to be installed.

For Linux, well... much longer.

Haiku has come an incredibly long way very fast thanks to 'merely' being, essentially, a reimplementation of a prior work - design decisions are mostly already made for you.

Think before you speak.

--The loon

Reply Parent Score: 7

RE[2]: All very nice...
by Delgarde on Tue 23rd Feb 2010 03:51 in reply to "RE: All very nice..."
Delgarde Member since:
2008-08-19

Think before you speak.

--The loon


Like I say, I'd be interested in trying it out. But based on the limited info on the Haiku website, it doesn't seem like it's really in a state where that'd be worthwhile yet - not being able to connect to the internet is a bit of a show-stopper, given this is a desktop OS...

Maybe in another year, it might be mature enough to be worth a closer look. But not right now...

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE: All very nice...
by TQH ! on Tue 23rd Feb 2010 09:57 in reply to "All very nice..."
TQH ! Member since:
2006-03-16

This is how the alpha runs videos in VESA mode on an NVidia ION, which the author claims he couldn't manage in either Windows or Linux:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=W3dsDf_DkII

Btw, the alpha is really slow compared to the nightlies.

Reply Parent Score: 1

RE: All very nice...
by Zenja on Tue 23rd Feb 2010 11:12 in reply to "All very nice..."
Zenja Member since:
2005-07-06

A little bird has informed me that a Haiku port of Nouveau and RadeonHD has recently started - expect an official announcement around BeGeistert time (April 10-11th).

Reply Parent Score: 1

RE: All very nice...
by Earl Colby pottinger on Tue 23rd Feb 2010 16:41 in reply to "All very nice..."
Earl Colby pottinger Member since:
2005-07-06
RE: All very nice...
by Michael Oliveira on Wed 24th Feb 2010 07:54 in reply to "All very nice..."
Michael Oliveira Member since:
2005-07-07

You may collaborate porting radeonhd driver from X to Haiku ;)

Reply Parent Score: 1