Linked by Thom Holwerda on Mon 29th Mar 2010 12:59 UTC, submitted by NiceGuyEddie
Games The PlayStation 3 Slim already had an ability penalty of -35 Geekiness because of its lack of the "Install Other OS" option, and now the regular PlayStation 3 will follow in its footsteps. A PS3 firmware update, scheduled to land April 1, will disable this option on regular PS3s as well. This, dear readers, is what we in the business call a "testicle move", especially since only a few weeks ago, Sony bold-facedly claimed the feature would not be removed.
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Comment by Kroc
by Kroc on Mon 29th Mar 2010 13:59 UTC
Kroc
Member since:
2005-11-10

I find it sad that our games consoles don’t come with the ability for us to do with them as we please. Just look at the lifetime, success and market that grew up around the Commodore 64 just because when you switched it on it said "Ready".

Imagine what would be possible if you could plug in a keyboard and mouse into a PS3 or a Wii and everything was available to you. There is no question in my mind that Sony could increase sales by an order of magnitude if the console was open to hacking; and I’m not just talking about selling it to people who want to tinker, I’m referring to the ecosystem that would build up around the computer. Books, websites, developer tools, distribution channels, rights to innovative games.

Both Sony and Nintendo are being very narrow minded.

Reply Score: 5

RE: Comment by Kroc
by henderson101 on Mon 29th Mar 2010 14:10 in reply to "Comment by Kroc"
henderson101 Member since:
2006-05-30

I find it sad that our games consoles don’t come with the ability for us to do with them as we please. Just look at the lifetime, success and market that grew up around the Commodore 64 just because when you switched it on it said "Ready".


You can still do this. It is called a Personal Computer. Look at the Atari/Coleco/Intelivision consoles of a similar era. None supported the above either.

Imagine what would be possible if you could plug in a keyboard and mouse into [..] a Wii and everything was available to you.


You can. I've done this. Even without Homebrew, the Wii will surf the web, has some kind of Flash and will play (in the UK) BBC iPlayer content directly on the console. Pretty sweet. The iPlayer interface is better than the one on other platforms (Virgin Cable/FreeView/Web) and snappy, given the relative sluggishness of the console.

Reply Parent Score: 1

RE[2]: Comment by Kroc
by Kroc on Mon 29th Mar 2010 15:30 in reply to "RE: Comment by Kroc"
Kroc Member since:
2005-11-10

Uh, did you exist before 1990? The iPlayer is not an example to parallel how open access to the C64 changed the world.

Reply Parent Score: 3

RE: Comment by Kroc
by saidge@yahoo.com on Mon 29th Mar 2010 14:24 in reply to "Comment by Kroc"
saidge@yahoo.com Member since:
2007-11-06

Sony is a company that is tied very closely to the entertainment industry. They are also a company with very deep pockets. I'm sure they've made promises to partners in the entertainment industry (or have contractual obligations) to protect the IP of media stored or run on their systems. With the linux sandbox being circumvented in order to reach the main system... I assume they judged that breaching the trust of a relatively small group of consumers (compared to those who use all of their products, and on a lesser scale, compared to those who use their consoles without the need for linux) vs. breaching the trust of their partners and breaking contracts would prove much more costly.

It's evil. But their hands are tied if they want to stay a big dog in entertainment.

Reply Parent Score: 1

RE: Comment by Kroc
by tylerdurden on Mon 29th Mar 2010 15:49 in reply to "Comment by Kroc"
tylerdurden Member since:
2009-03-17

... and yet Sony and Nintendo are still in business, while Commodore went the way of the dodo. Their last efforts to remain in business, involved the creation of a closed console of all things.

The C64 success was due mainly to one thing: it's price. It was also sold as a computer, why you used it to compare against a console is beyond me.

Edited 2010-03-29 15:50 UTC

Reply Parent Score: 1

RE[2]: Comment by Kroc
by Kroc on Mon 29th Mar 2010 16:15 in reply to "RE: Comment by Kroc"
Kroc Member since:
2005-11-10

Because it had 6’000 games, many of which came from bedroom coders. Where do you think Code Masters came from? People like the Oliver Twins. Many of the companies and the people in them making games today came from the Commodore 64 / Spectrum era.

Sony and Nintendo are ensuring that developing on their platforms is only available to a select few that climb the ranks, get the lucky breaks, are in the biggest companies with enough money; where as back in the C64 days talent came from the freedom users had at home.

The PSX era was written on the back of the bedroom coding era, Code Masters et al. Without the C64 there would not have been as many good PSX games like Colin McRae Rally.

If the PS3 and Wii were open to development by anybody then the next generation of programmers would be cheaper, more creative and producing much, much more innovative stuff than Kill Death 3: The Sequeliser.

Edited 2010-03-29 16:18 UTC

Reply Parent Score: 3

RE[2]: Comment by Kroc
by bugjacobs on Mon 29th Mar 2010 19:25 in reply to "RE: Comment by Kroc"
bugjacobs Member since:
2009-01-03

The CD32 was not a closed console I believe ? Couldnt everyone get the devkit ?

However it was severly limited, having virtually no IO except the CDROM out of the box, although it was later made a couple of extensionkits that made it into a regular A1200 compatible computer.. Sadly Commodore went bust before these expansions gained any large userbase..

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE[2]: Comment by Kroc
by bugjacobs on Mon 29th Mar 2010 19:37 in reply to "RE: Comment by Kroc"
bugjacobs Member since:
2009-01-03

The C64s success was mainly its openness, that ANYONE could sit down and type programs into that "READY" prompt ! It INVITED us to it !

I grew up in that era and know it firsthand .. !
Even the Amiga was not as good as C64 .. Even then devtools and manuals cost an arm and a leg.

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE[2]: Comment by Kroc
by ebasconp on Mon 29th Mar 2010 21:14 in reply to "RE: Comment by Kroc"
ebasconp Member since:
2006-05-09

I completely agree with all the things you say right now.

I do not know why they forbid YOU to install anything YOU want in YOUR device; that's quite ridiculous... I know, you accepted the license when you bought such device but being forbidden to use the things I buy in the way I want to use them does not make sense to me.

I do not know if Apple with its iPhone started this trend but I do not like it and I do not want it to continue.

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE: Comment by Kroc
by nt_jerkface on Mon 29th Mar 2010 16:23 in reply to "Comment by Kroc"
nt_jerkface Member since:
2009-08-26


Imagine what would be possible if you could plug in a keyboard and mouse into a PS3 or a Wii and everything was available to you. There is no question in my mind that Sony could increase sales by an order of magnitude if the console was open to hacking;


That would just result in widespread piracy. When it comes to game consoles pirates have always outnumbered tinkerers. Sony sells its console at a loss and makes up for it with game sales. Allowing total access would just make it the preferred platform for pirates. Sony could care less about hardware sales that go to people who have no intention of buying games.

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE[2]: Comment by Kroc
by bugjacobs on Mon 29th Mar 2010 19:40 in reply to "RE: Comment by Kroc"
bugjacobs Member since:
2009-01-03

They have to calculate that so called Piracy into the equation .. And appeal to peoples honesty ..

Reply Parent Score: 1

RE: Comment by Kroc
by renhoek on Mon 29th Mar 2010 22:12 in reply to "Comment by Kroc"
renhoek Member since:
2007-04-29

Normally i agree with you, but this time you are totally wrong. When i want to tinker with hardware i buy some wierd and obscure ARM board and try to get linux running on it. Just for the fun of it, because i can.

I buy a ps3 to play games, and do not want to spend ANY brainpower to get it up and running. The interace should be easy and crash proof. And sony does not care about increased console sales since they lose money on the consoles.

But on topic, Sony should be shot for this. When i bought my PS3 i know it had all kind of nasty DRM shit. I didn't really care and i bought it. I also knew i could run linux if i really wanted to (i didn't, but not the point). Now Sony takes this option away, what if they started to remove the browser and other suff i actually use?

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE: Comment by Kroc
by Odwalla on Tue 30th Mar 2010 00:23 in reply to "Comment by Kroc"
Odwalla Member since:
2006-02-01

I'm confused by your comparison of a the openness of a general purpose computer to the single-task mindset of a console. Your analogy might be more apt if you had used the Colecovision as an example, as it was a console first and a general computing device second. The Commodore 64, though was always a general purpose computing device. Comparing its openness to the closed nature of a console illustrates nothing.

Reply Parent Score: 1