Linked by Kroc Camen on Fri 9th Apr 2010 10:29 UTC
Linux "To be clear about this article's intent, it's not to bash Microsoft, or Windows. Because to be fair, despite using Linux 95% of the time while I'm on the PC, I can find more faults with it than Windows. So, this article's goal is to highlight some of the major pluses of Linux, and also showcase where Windows could improve in the future, should Microsoft take heed of the suggestions."
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RE[2]: Comment by tuma324
by lemur2 on Fri 9th Apr 2010 12:40 UTC in reply to "RE: Comment by tuma324"
lemur2
Member since:
2007-02-17

"
What are these things that Windows can do better than Linux?


- Work with projectors.
"

RandR works just fine.

- Audio. Linux audio is currently more broken than ever


Nope. Works beautifully out of the box (KDE). Can't say the same for Windows (you will often have to find a 3rd party driver for your audio).

- Gaming


Fair enough.

I'll see your "gaming" and raise you "formats supported", "interoperability" and "cross-platform support".

Edited 2010-04-09 12:42 UTC

Reply Parent Score: 4

RE[3]: Comment by tuma324
by Laurence on Fri 9th Apr 2010 13:24 in reply to "RE[2]: Comment by tuma324"
Laurence Member since:
2007-03-26

[AUDIO]
Nope. Works beautifully out of the box (KDE). Can't say the same for Windows (you will often have to find a 3rd party driver for your audio).


As a DJ and producer, Linux audio is rubbish compared to Windows.

Sure, for basic desktop uses, Linux audio is mostly ok. But move into the professional spaces and it's a complete mess.

For example: It's taken me longer to get one external sound processing unit recognised as the primary sound card in OSS than installing an entire XP system from scratch including studio apps such as Soundforge, Ableton, FL Studio, and more than a dozen VST(i)s.
And that was /JUST/ setting up /ONE/ device in OSS. It still doesn't work in ALSA et al. I still haven't got Jack working either.

So as much as I love Linux and use it as my primary desktop, I'm not going to waste my entire time setting up a Linux studio workstation when I should be writing music on it. For me, Linux audio isn't even at Windows 2000's level - and that's just unacceptable.

The worst thing is, it's not even as if Linux couldn't work as a functional professional audio workstation. If FSF/GNU/whoever just sat down and agreed a concise standard and then spent some time giving it a little love, they could bring Linux audio into the 21st century with in no time (comparatively speaking). But as always, there's too many cooks in the kitchen and nobody serving the food (excuse the analogy).

Edited 2010-04-09 13:26 UTC

Reply Parent Score: 4

jabbotts Member since:
2007-09-06

It's also an area where hardware manufacturers cripple the end user. Your gear probably includes a vendor provided Windows driver. Even Creative is guilty of this though in there defense, they at least released the X-FI driver source to the Alsa project when they decided not continue it's development. Driver source or, at minimum, driver interface specs would go a long way to fixing audio along with other hardware issues.

Heck, Creative's guilt isn't even limited to Linux based platforms; the Windows drivers are horrible to manage. Sure, the base driver is just an EXE but go to the update applet and you'll find a confusing list of extra crap regardless of if it's installed or not. And printers, why can't any printer company deliver a simple driver without the added crap bundled into it; I really don't need a quarter of my screen taken up by a stupid graph GUI of ink levels why my document prints. And, not just consumer grade printers, our beasts in the office have a nice useless status popup which provides no benefit to the business users who have nothing to do with maintaining the printers.

There's all kinds of guilt to spread around for hardware related grief in both OS categories.

At least Alsa's beta drivers with X-FI support has consistently been easier than any audio related Windows driver I've done.

Edited 2010-04-09 15:15 UTC

Reply Parent Score: 4

RE[4]: Comment by tuma324
by lemur2 on Sat 10th Apr 2010 08:03 in reply to "RE[3]: Comment by tuma324"
lemur2 Member since:
2007-02-17

"[AUDIO]
Nope. Works beautifully out of the box (KDE). Can't say the same for Windows (you will often have to find a 3rd party driver for your audio).


As a DJ and producer, Linux audio is rubbish compared to Windows.

Sure, for basic desktop uses, Linux audio is mostly ok. But move into the professional spaces and it's a complete mess.

For example: It's taken me longer to get one external sound processing unit recognised as the primary sound card in OSS than installing an entire XP system from scratch including studio apps such as Soundforge, Ableton, FL Studio, and more than a dozen VST(i)s.
And that was /JUST/ setting up /ONE/ device in OSS. It still doesn't work in ALSA et al. I still haven't got Jack working either.

So as much as I love Linux and use it as my primary desktop, I'm not going to waste my entire time setting up a Linux studio workstation when I should be writing music on it. For me, Linux audio isn't even at Windows 2000's level - and that's just unacceptable.

The worst thing is, it's not even as if Linux couldn't work as a functional professional audio workstation. If FSF/GNU/whoever just sat down and agreed a concise standard and then spent some time giving it a little love, they could bring Linux audio into the 21st century with in no time (comparatively speaking). But as always, there's too many cooks in the kitchen and nobody serving the food (excuse the analogy).
"

http://distrowatch.com/?newsid=05992

http://puredyne.goto10.org/

Reply Parent Score: 1

RE[4]: Comment by tuma324
by coolvibe on Wed 14th Apr 2010 09:44 in reply to "RE[3]: Comment by tuma324"
coolvibe Member since:
2007-08-16
RE[3]: Comment by tuma324
by aesiamun on Fri 9th Apr 2010 18:39 in reply to "RE[2]: Comment by tuma324"
aesiamun Member since:
2005-06-29

I have some really obscure sound hardware and windows 7 found it out of the box. typical that linux users use XP or earlier problems as problems with windows...when really those problems are in the past.

Reply Parent Score: 1