Linked by Thom Holwerda on Tue 20th Apr 2010 09:52 UTC
Windows We already know quite a lot about Windows Phone 7, but there's also a boatload of stuff we do not yet know. Dutch (oh yeah) technology news website Tweakers.net managed to get hold of a number of confidential internal Microsoft documents [Dutch] regarding Windows Phone 7, and they contain some intriguing stuff.
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RE[3]: Questionable Point
by PlatformAgnostic on Tue 20th Apr 2010 18:12 UTC in reply to "RE[2]: Questionable Point"
PlatformAgnostic
Member since:
2006-01-02

What's really wrong with drive letters? Other than the fact that there are only 26 letters in the alphabet, they're pretty easy to understand for a typical user.

If you're advanced you can make a drive appear in any (empty) directory using junctions or symlinks, so it's possible to do it otherwise, but I don't see why people scoff so easily at drive letters.

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE[4]: Questionable Point
by darknexus on Tue 20th Apr 2010 18:55 in reply to "RE[3]: Questionable Point"
darknexus Member since:
2008-07-15

What's really wrong with drive letters? Other than the fact that there are only 26 letters in the alphabet, they're pretty easy to understand for a typical user.

If you're advanced you can make a drive appear in any (empty) directory using junctions or symlinks, so it's possible to do it otherwise, but I don't see why people scoff so easily at drive letters.


Because you're never certain which drive letter some of your media will appear under unless you explicitly assign it. An example for you: I was loading XP on to someone's system using an auto-install disk. This computer had an integrated sd/mmc card reader as many do, there was no media in the drive. Windows installed ok, or so I thought, but then I rebooted and come to find that Windows ended up assigning the i: drive to the internal hard disk for some odd reason. It had assigned the sd reader to c:, however, Windows still thought it had been installed to c:. You can guess what happened then, I think.
With any modern mounting-based os, you know where the automount is going to place your volumes. In Linux, for example, it's /media/VolumeName (where VolumeName is the name of the filesystem). On OS X it's /Volumes/VolumeName, on (Open)Solaris it's /rmdisk/VolumeName, etc. There's no questioning where things are going to end up, unlike with drive letters which Windows has an annoying habbit of swapping around without warning unless you explicitly go into diskpart and assign one permanently.
It's time for drive letters to die the death they've deserved for twenty years. It was a fine concept when all you had to worry about was one or two floppy drives and one internal hard drive, but it has no place in modern computing. Just one of the endless backward-compatibility bits of cruft in Windows.
Edit: Come to think of it, I just remembered one other os that still uses drive letters: Symbian.

Edited 2010-04-20 18:57 UTC

Reply Parent Score: 2