Linked by Thom Holwerda on Mon 19th Apr 2010 13:10 UTC
Linux We all know Synaptics, the company that seems to produce just about every touchpad you can get your hands fingers on. Their touchpads also do a lot of multitouch and gesture stuff, but up until now, their set of gestures, the Synaptics Gesture Suite, was only available on Windows. Luckily, they've ported it over to Linux, and made it available for OEMs building Linux laptops.
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RE[7]: Comment by spinnekopje
by spiderman on Wed 21st Apr 2010 15:28 UTC in reply to "RE[6]: Comment by spinnekopje"
spiderman
Member since:
2008-10-23

not exactly comparing apples and apples are we?

it was an hyperbole:
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hyperbole

What does that have to do with the price of a haircut in Taiwan? (I can make non sequiturs too!)
I was refering to the fact that many computers sold as "Vista ready" could not actually run Vista.
What?? Now installing Linux on a netbook is hacking???

Maybe not for you indeed. What I meant is that most people who bought the netbook you bought didn't install another distro on it, despite what you say. I'm pretty sure about that. They surf the web and read emails. They got it from their phone carrier.
Anyway, I'll address your comment about Ubuntu breaking things, yes they do. Ubuntu is based on unstable software. They break everything every 6 months. They have LTS releases that are somewhat less unstable. If you have to run Ubuntu, I advise you to stick to LTS releases. But if you don't, there are more stables distros that don't break your system every six months and try not to introduce big regressions when you upgrade. The stable distros that I think about are debian (stable), Red hat, slackware, etc...
Ubuntu is one of the so called "bleeding edge" distros. If you use it, you are in for some bugs and regressions every now and then. People use it because they want to experiment with new features and sometimes because it's the only distro they know. In the later case, they would be better advised to read some more before choosing Ubuntu.

Edited 2010-04-21 15:31 UTC

Reply Parent Score: 2

bornagainenguin Member since:
2005-08-07

spiderman clarified...

I was refering to the fact that many computers sold as "Vista ready" could not actually run Vista.


Aren't we supposed to be better than that? It's an excuse for the unexcusable. It was inexcusable for Microsoft when manufacturers lied about the hardware being "Vista capable" and it is inexcusable for people to give distros a pass for breaking hardware support on devices that already worked. People like yourself complain that people buy hardware without considering its Linux compatibility--but what good is it for anyone to check when the kernel developers can and do break that compatibility later?

spiderman clarified...
What?? Now installing Linux on a netbook is hacking???

Maybe not for you indeed. What I meant is that most people who bought the netbook you bought didn't install another distro on it, despite what you say. I'm pretty sure about that. They surf the web and read emails. They got it from their phone carrier.


Can you provide a source for that? I see all kinds of people with eeepcs on the eeeuser.com forums. They did not get theirs with a phone contract. The majority of them bought their eeepcs as a Linux device (or at least certainly as a Linux capable device, with the hardware supported out of the box in Linux.)

spiderman clarified...
Anyway, I'll address your comment about Ubuntu breaking things, yes they do. Ubuntu is based on unstable software. They break everything every 6 months. They have LTS releases that are somewhat less unstable.


That's a nice bit of deflecting there. I run Ubuntu simply because it is the best supported for my use (I like my GUI very much thank you) but the issues I mention have their roots with the kernel developers, not Ubuntu. The issues are in the kernel, thus the problems are across all distros unless they build their own kernel and try to add back in support theimselves. So far I have yet to see a distro that has as good hardware support for my eeepc as what Ubuntu does in Hardy-Intrepid using the array.org kernel and eee-control.

spiderman clarified...
If you have to run Ubuntu, I advise you to stick to LTS releases. But if you don't, there are more stables distros that don't break your system every six months and try not to introduce big regressions when you upgrade. The stable distros that I think about are debian (stable), Red hat, slackware, etc...


Hmmm... really?

* Debian stable -- You kidding me? Getting things to work on Debian stable on an eeepc is as close to hacking as I ever want to come and you're recommending it?

* Red Hat -- Last I checked Fedora had the same issues with drivers Ubuntu has and needs a custom kernel to make work. Even with the custom kernel it runs hot on my eeepc and the WiFi support seems flaky and keeps losing the signal. On the off chance you actually meant Red hat, the server, there isn't any hardware support for the eeepc at ALL in Red hat that I'm aware of.

* Slackware -- No Gnome. Not interested. (I looked into trying to use one of the alternate addon Gnome enviroments but when the distro creator is actively hostile to your desktop enviroment there isn't much point in trying to hack around him. He'll break your system faster than they can fix it... Too much hassle.

spiderman clarified...
Ubuntu is one of the so called "bleeding edge" distros. If you use it, you are in for some bugs and regressions every now and then. People use it because they want to experiment with new features and sometimes because it's the only distro they know. In the later case, they would be better advised to read some more before choosing Ubuntu.


Or they use it because it actually is better than the competition in a lot of ways and no one else has stepped up to the plate to offer the benefits they have with something better. I am hardly happy with the some of the things that go on in Ubuntu, but I have to say this is definitely a case where they suck less. As it is I continue to use earlier versions of the distro because it works well enough as is and I can fix what doesn't work for me a lot easier there than in other distros.

I like how you've managed to turn this into a thread about Ubuntu, rather than one about how the kernel developers break hardware support. You refuse to admit that someone can buy hardware with Linux in mind only to have the ground shift from underneath of them because someone in the kernel developers clique gets a bug up their butt. Get it right, this isn't a distro problem we're having--it's a kernel problem and it effects everybody sooner or later.

--bornagainpenguin

Reply Parent Score: 2