Linked by Thom Holwerda on Mon 3rd May 2010 23:17 UTC, submitted by PLan
Apple Well, this is interesting, and, I must say, rather surprising: the New York Post is reporting that the US Department of Justice and the Federal Trade Commission are looking into launching an antitrust probe into Apple's policies. You'd expect this to be about iTunes, but that's just the thing: it's about the Adobe-Apple spat. Update: Since I'm not familiar with the entire US media landscape, I was unaware the New York Post is considered less than reputable. Still, Reuters has confirmed the Post's report, so maybe it's true after all.
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Premature
by Duckula on Tue 4th May 2010 03:15 UTC
Duckula
Member since:
2010-05-04

Hang on! This is a report of rumour/speculation.

Im not religous about Operating Systems or Computer vendors. At this point in time I selectivly choose to use Apple gear over other manufacturers because it offers me the choice that sucks least.

I support Apple in endeavouring to ensure the best end user experience on their mobile products.

Lets not forget that Microsoft got where they are by ruthless monopolist practices.

Apple got where they are by out designing all competition.

Nobody is forcing you to own Apple's products, if they dont meet your needs, move on & spend your money elswhere. If Apple want to ensure the highest quality product, that's their choice.

Edited 2010-05-04 03:21 UTC

Reply Score: -1

RE: Premature
by jptros on Tue 4th May 2010 14:19 in reply to "Premature"
jptros Member since:
2005-08-26

Nobody is forcing you to own Apple's products, if they dont meet your needs, move on & spend your money elswhere. If Apple want to ensure the highest quality product, that's their choice.


What happens when other products no longer suit your needs because of Apple's new app store policies? The implications of Apple's new restrictions on application development for their mobile devices reaches further than "If you don't like it don't use it" because Apple's mobile app store is probably the most widely used store and hence probably the most targeted platform by developers. When it's no longer profitable or feasible for a developer to produce their applications for multiple platforms (because Apple has locked out cross platform frameworks) the app store will probably win to others which means the competition is being shut out and my choice as a consumer is being limited.

Wake up! This has nothing to do with the best user experience or how much flash sucks.

Reply Parent Score: 4

RE: Premature
by jteg on Tue 4th May 2010 22:39 in reply to "Premature"
jteg Member since:
2009-06-01

That is part of the issue. Apple should not decide which applications are good for the consumer, it should be up to the market/consumer to choose. If I create a crappy app, the market will determine its death. If Apple has a crappy app, and prevents a better app from reaching consumers since the appStore is the only conduit to consumers, then they are controlling the market unfairly. Once Apple opened up its SDK for others to develop apps and created the appStore, then they created a market.

Reply Parent Score: 1