Linked by William from Texas on Thu 3rd Jun 2010 21:30 UTC
Linux Last week's release of MeeGo v1 is an effort by US chip maker Intel and European cellular giant Nokia to enter the mobile OS arena. Will it be able to compete? While Apple and Google vie for market dominance, MeeGo offers itself as a 3rd choice with strong Linux roots.
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RE[2]: Comment by diegocg
by ssokolow on Thu 3rd Jun 2010 23:03 UTC in reply to "RE: Comment by diegocg"
ssokolow
Member since:
2010-01-21

Actually, it wouldn't surprise me if webcams are to be accessed via the in-development QtMultimedia module designed to abstract away low-level multimedia I/O.

Qt has quite the growing collection of abstractions for common mobile device functionality.

Edited 2010-06-03 23:03 UTC

Reply Parent Score: 4

RE[3]: Comment by diegocg
by Delgarde on Fri 4th Jun 2010 02:17 in reply to "RE[2]: Comment by diegocg"
Delgarde Member since:
2008-08-19

Actually, it wouldn't surprise me if webcams are to be accessed via the in-development QtMultimedia module designed to abstract away low-level multimedia I/O.


Perhaps, but that's just an example. The point is, using Qt helps with portability, but no matter how much it grows to cover, not all applications can be built using nothing but Qt. And as soon as you have to use something else, you have to worry about the portability of whatever that "something else" is.

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE[4]: Comment by diegocg
by danieldk on Fri 4th Jun 2010 11:14 in reply to "RE[3]: Comment by diegocg"
danieldk Member since:
2005-11-18

Perhaps, but that's just an example. The point is, using Qt helps with portability, but no matter how much it grows to cover, not all applications can be built using nothing but Qt. And as soon as you have to use something else, you have to worry about the portability of whatever that "something else" is.


It just happens to be that UI widgets, threading, multimedia, and to a lesser extend networking are among things that happen to be most platform-bound. And Qt abstracts the platform away there. Sure, there are some holes, but many other libraries that you'll usually include are not highly platform dependent.

A more serious problem is incompatibility between libraries. There are many C++ libraries for, say unicode string handling or linear algebra. It would be nicer if we can standardize on a common base (such as Qt), so that at least things like passing around strings is easier. Of course, this will not happen, except if one set of libraries (either Qt or Glib/Gtk+) conquer a significant of the market. Discussion will never pick a standard here.

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE[3]: Comment by diegocg
by dragos.pop on Fri 4th Jun 2010 12:21 in reply to "RE[2]: Comment by diegocg"
dragos.pop Member since:
2010-01-08

Take a look at QT Mobility project.
It will give you a portable way to access mobile phone sensors (Acceleration, Position...), camera, contacts, calendar, SMS/MMS ...
When all this will be release quality it will cover over 90% of the needs of phone app developers.
So you could write a program and compile for everything, all in ANSI C++ and QT (close to java's write once, run everywhere).

Unfortunately IPhone and Android will not be supported anytime soon.

Reply Parent Score: 2