Linked by Thom Holwerda on Fri 10th Dec 2010 22:54 UTC, submitted by Debjit
Ubuntu, Kubuntu, Xubuntu Yet another possible change in Ubuntu's core components: they're mulling over replacing GDM with LightDM. Why? Well: "Faster - the greeter doesn't require an entire GNOME session to run. More flexible - multiple greeters are supported through a well defined interface. This allows Ubuntu derivatives to use the same display manager (e.g. Kubuntu, Lubuntu etc.). Simpler codebase - similar feature set in ~5000 lines of code compared to 50000 in GDM. Supports more usecases - first class support for XDMCP and multihead."
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RE[3]: nice
by darknexus on Sat 11th Dec 2010 08:31 UTC in reply to "RE[2]: nice"
darknexus
Member since:
2008-07-15

" but a slow and steady approach that ensures things are done right is best. Not a fast and loose barrage of half-implemented changes that confuse and confound users.


You are assuming stable releases won't be stable. I think that's a big assumption. And, if stability is your main objective, just use debian proper or one of the other distros you mentioned.
"

Given that Ubuntu is supposedly the Linux for the masses, one would think stability would be a top priority. After all, Linux is so much more stable than Windows could ever be, right? As for the changes breaking something, I think one need only look back at previous Ubuntu releases, particularly every release after 8.04, to see just why people don't like it when Ubuntu does drastic changes. They seem to do changes for the sake of changing things, not always because it's a better or approach and they never test anything very well besides. Sorry, but six months between releases is not enough time to do it properly, and Ubuntu's track record proves it. The one change they've proposed that I think *must* be implemented is to separate out the software repositories so that people don't have to upgrade their os to get the latest Firefox via software center. Imho, that one should take top priority, as it will help the masses more than any visual or display manager change. Follow it up, naturally, with replacing X as the core display technology. Then, and only then, worry about trivial things like the login display manager or visual theming. What good is a theme when the rest of your os is half-baked?

Reply Parent Score: 7

RE[4]: nice
by backdoc on Sat 11th Dec 2010 16:13 in reply to "RE[3]: nice"
backdoc Member since:
2006-01-14

Ubuntu has become "Linux for the masses", or at least the most popular distro, by doing exactly what you criticize them for, not by being "half-baked" and not being scared to innovate.

I don't think everything they do works out perfect. When you make an omelette, you have to break eggs. I think they are moving in the right direction. And, I still like Ubuntu. Having said that, it can be annoying to pay the price of innovation. I moved to Debian from Ubuntu a couple of years ago because I got tired of Ubuntu updates breaking small things. But, I've never felt like Ubuntu was half-baked. And, I am planning to reinstall Ubuntu in the next couple of weeks. I forgive the rough spots because they get ironed out. And, the end result is worth it.

I just installed Ubuntu on my 74 year old dad's laptop. He's way happier with Ubuntu than Vista. It runs so much faster. And, because he was already using Firefox and Thunderbird, he never missed a beat.

More on topic, isn't it possible that some of the troubles that Ubuntu runs into with innovating due to legacy code in X or code that just isn't required for their audience? Getting rid of code that doesn't support your mission might result in fewer rough spots and free them up for even more innovation.

Chill out. Focus on the end result, don't dwell the rough spots and in the end, you will probably have a distro that you can proudly recommend to friends.

Edited 2010-12-11 16:15 UTC

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE[5]: nice
by nt_jerkface on Sun 12th Dec 2010 06:47 in reply to "RE[4]: nice"
nt_jerkface Member since:
2009-08-26

Ubuntu has become "Linux for the masses", or at least the most popular distro, by doing exactly what you criticize them for, not by being "half-baked" and not being scared to innovate.


Innovate how? By moving titlebar buttons to the left? The misuse of brown?

They became #1 by dumping millions into marketing. The major improvements in the past five years have been from kernel contributers, not Ubuntu.

Ubuntu hasn't done much for Linux market share, it's simply become the de facto Gnome distro.

Reply Parent Score: 0

RE[4]: nice
by ozonehole on Sun 12th Dec 2010 04:24 in reply to "RE[3]: nice"
ozonehole Member since:
2006-01-07

As for the changes breaking something, I think one need only look back at previous Ubuntu releases, particularly every release after 8.04, to see just why people don't like it when Ubuntu does drastic changes.


Funny, I'm using 10.10, the latest Ubuntu release. It's the most stable I've seen yet. I'm quite pleased with the latest changes, especially the fact that this release boots in 16 seconds on my old decrepit computer - back when I was running stable Red Hat, it would take 45 seconds.

Ubuntu developers: please keep those changes coming.

Edited 2010-12-12 04:25 UTC

Reply Parent Score: 3