Linked by Thom Holwerda on Fri 7th Jan 2011 18:00 UTC
Mac OS X Remember the good old days? The good old days when people cried loads of foul over the inconsistency in the Windows user interface? You know, applications deviating from the norm - with even Microsoft seemingly doing whatever pleased them? This was considered a huge problem, especially by those from the Macintosh and Apple camp. Oh, how the times have changed.
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Paradigm_Shift
Member since:
2010-12-01

Please go back and re-read my post. It is my prediction, and I never said that the App Store is the only way to install software on a Mac today. Now, however, suppose that Apple does decide to make the App Store the only approved and permissible method of installing software on the Mac?

I suggested some reasons why they might want to do that. Apple (and really, Steve Jobs) are all about control. Everything they do and their rational behind it is about exercising control over their hardware and software, and over their customers. So, eventually extending that control over the Mac line only makes sense.

Reply Parent Score: 1

kaiwai Member since:
2005-07-06

Please go back and re-read my post. It is my prediction, and I never said that the App Store is the only way to install software on a Mac today. Now, however, suppose that Apple does decide to make the App Store the only approved and permissible method of installing software on the Mac?

I suggested some reasons why they might want to do that. Apple (and really, Steve Jobs) are all about control. Everything they do and their rational behind it is about exercising control over their hardware and software, and over their customers. So, eventually extending that control over the Mac line only makes sense.


There is no use correcting some people - I saw what you wrote and I can't work out why some people to the conclusions that they do. The only way they could come to such conclusions is if they don't actually read the post but instead scan it, look for keywords and make assumptions about what you're saying without actually reading what you said in the post.

Regarding iOS and Apple's relationship with carriers - I think there is a lot more going on behind the scenes than simple Apple deciding not to allow people to install 'custom applications' on the devices. One can observe how much other devices are locked down by carriers and come to the conclusion that there were demands placed on Apple and Apple decided to keep the store in house. Remember when the iPhone was launched Apple was in NO position to negotiate and even today they're still very much at the mercy of the carrier. People may like to think that Apple is the 'renegade' who 'sets the standard' but they're always going to be at the mercy of the carriers that are out there. For Apple it is choosing the carrier that sucks the least and so far AT&T at the time were the ones who sucked the least.

I don't see anytime in the future it becoming bound to Mac's because it is a completely different kettle of fish when compared to devices such as the iPhone/iPad/iPod Touch. Little is gained locking it down but you'll probably see Apple move away from shipping physical software in the future, market as a 'Apple becoming Green', and the operating system will be the only thing shipped on physical media but even then you might have a downloadable version of Mac OS X in the future that can be loaded onto a thumb drive once the optical drive is removed then used to upgrade the operating system. Apple might have a secretive control freakish persona but I don't think they're so stupid as to shoot themselves in the foot.

Edited 2011-01-10 01:17 UTC

Reply Parent Score: 2