Linked by Thom Holwerda on Sat 5th Feb 2011 00:14 UTC
Multimedia, AV Piracy hurts the content industry. This has been the common line of thought in the piracy and copyright debate for years now, and even though study after study highlight that this is simply not the case - or at least, not as clear-cut a case - the content industry and its avid fans continue to spread this party line. Well, yet another study, this time from the Japanese government, has concluded that piracy actually increases anime DVD sales.
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Thom_Holwerda
Member since:
2005-06-29

Single player PC games already have piracy rates of over 50% and piracy is illegal. Legalizing piracy would put piracy rates past 99%.


Piracy is legal in The Netherlands and most other European countries, yet piracy rates are no higher or lower here than in the US. In other words, you're talking out of your ass.

Reply Parent Score: 4

nt_jerkface Member since:
2009-08-26

No it is only fully legal in certain parts of Asia where piracy rates of games are over 99%.

Stores in the Netherlands are not filled with pirated material.

Reply Parent Score: 2

WereCatf Member since:
2006-02-15

<quote>No it is only fully legal in certain parts of Asia where piracy rates of games are over 99%.

Stores in the Netherlands are not filled with pirated material.</quote>

You're confusing downloading pirates for personal use with selling pirated material. They clearly aren't the same thing.

But then again, you have the tendency of twisting things around.

Reply Parent Score: 3

daveak Member since:
2008-12-29

Oh stop with this complete bullshit that piracy is legal. The Netherlands and all other European countries are signatories of the Berne convention therefore copyright laws apply. More so the Netherlands is a member of the EU so the EU copyright directive will apply although maybe you haven't implemented it quite just yet).

If there is a piece of legislation in your country that overrides international treaty then please identify it along with the section that states you are allowed to breach copyright law. There may be exemptions that state you are allowed to copy material you own for your own use but there will not be anything that states you can take anything you like legally.

Reply Parent Score: 0

Thom_Holwerda Member since:
2005-06-29

If there is a piece of legislation in your country that overrides international treaty then please identify it along with the section that states you are allowed to breach copyright law. There may be exemptions that state you are allowed to copy material you own for your own use but there will not be anything that states you can take anything you like legally.


There is, reiterated in various high-profile court cases and by several ministers of Justice. Our laws on the 'thuiskopie' (personal copy, paragraph 1, article 16b copyright law 1912) do not state the copy itself has to come from a legal source. As such, the consequence is that even if the source is illegal, you are allowed to download it. This is not just my interpretation - it has consistently been confirmed like this by courts of law and our minister of Justice.

There has been talk of changing this, but there is simply no majority for it in parliament. As our Justice minister explained several times, making downloading illegal would serve no purpose, since it would only criminalise the entire population with no way to actually do anything about it. The key concept is that you need to actually profit off breaking copyright law before it makes sense to prosecute.

In addition, there's a levy on empty media.

This construction allows law enforcement to go after professional pirates, without clogging up the legal system as is happening in the US.

http://www.iusmentis.com/auteursrecht/nl/thuiskopie/

This is the way many European countries approach copyright enforcement, and it's a good interim solution until copyright law is finally rewritten from the ground-up for the digital age.

I'm sorry if this annoys you, but it's established fact. Remember that we do not have common law, and as such, judges do not have any influence on lawmaking like judges on the US do. As such, it is impossible for this to change without amendments being made to our copyright law - which is unlikely to happen since even several music industry groups are vehemently opposed to it. These music industry groups argue that art is supposed to be heard and seen, and making downloading illegal will hinder this.

http://tweakers.net/nieuws/70953/artiestenbonden-en-consumentenbond...

Reply Parent Score: 2