Linked by Hadrien Grasland on Sat 5th Feb 2011 10:59 UTC
OSNews, Generic OSes So you have taken the test and you think you are ready to get started with OS development? At this point, many OS-deving hobbyists are tempted to go looking for a simple step-by-step tutorial which would guide them into making a binary boot, do some text I/O, and other "simple" stuff. The implicit plan is more or less as follow: any time they'll think about something which in their opinion would be cool to implement, they'll implement it. Gradually, feature after feature, their OS would supposedly build up, slowly getting superior to anything out there. This is, in my opinion, not the best way to get somewhere (if getting somewhere is your goal). In this article, I'll try to explain why, and what you should be doing at this stage instead in my opinion.
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Obvious and mundane
by rom508 on Sat 5th Feb 2011 12:09 UTC
rom508
Member since:
2007-04-20

I appreciate the author took time to write this article, but I'm sorry to say this article is obvious and mundane. There is really nothing interesting or insightful, just a list of motivational steps.

From reading the article I just get the feeling the author does not know much about operating systems design, but he tries to look clever and gives some advice to would be operating system developers from a lame user's prospective.

Reply Score: 0

RE: Obvious and mundane
by Kroc on Sat 5th Feb 2011 12:20 in reply to "Obvious and mundane"
Kroc Member since:
2005-11-10

You'd be surprised how many people don't stop to consider the obvious. Nobody gets taught to do that in school. Thinking of the obvious, it not an obvious thing to many.

Reply Parent Score: 4

RE[2]: Obvious and mundane
by Neolander on Sat 5th Feb 2011 13:13 in reply to "RE: Obvious and mundane"
Neolander Member since:
2010-03-08

Exactly. I've got a nice book about website usability where if you only read the author's twelve principles on the subject, you consider that she's just stating the obvious and wonder why you have bothered buying the book at all.

Then, if you take the time to read the rest of the book, you discover many, many examples of famous websites which don't follow these "obvious" rules.

Afterwards, you can consider that all website designers are idiots. Or admit that even when something sounds obvious, it's not necessarily so.

This, plus some time spent on OSdev's forums, is why I felt it was a good idea to include this part in my tutorial's plan. The "throw random features on a raw educational kernel and hope it sticks" attitude is much more prevalent that one would spontaneously think it is.

If an OS is meant to be used, considering it from the user's point of view first is a truly vital step. Because it allows to guide further design decisions, and avoid making something which tries to do everything at once, and ends up sucking in every area.

Edited 2011-02-05 13:30 UTC

Reply Parent Score: 1

RE: Obvious and mundane
by demetrioussharpe on Mon 7th Feb 2011 20:15 in reply to "Obvious and mundane"
demetrioussharpe Member since:
2009-01-09

I appreciate the author took time to write this article, but I'm sorry to say this article is obvious and mundane. There is really nothing interesting or insightful, just a list of motivational steps.

From reading the article I just get the feeling the author does not know much about operating systems design, but he tries to look clever and gives some advice to would be operating system developers from a lame user's prospective.


Consider your perspective now in comparison to your perspective when you first started with computers. With that in mind, consider the perspective of someone who's never worked on creating an OS before & compare that to the perspective of someone who has not only worked on one, but has also released one. That's quite a large gap in perspectives between the new guys & the guys who've been there and done that, correct? I'm sure that you'll agree that hindsight is 20/20 & there are many things that are obvious now, but once weren't.

Reply Parent Score: 1