Linked by Thom Holwerda on Mon 14th Feb 2011 22:50 UTC, submitted by gogothebee
PDAs, Cellphones, Wireless "I think that the advantages to Nokia are clear. Given the scant details revealed so far - perhaps no surprise given that nothing has been formalized just yet - Microsoft is the company in the more difficult position, and it has a lot of questions to answer."
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Two Sides
by Praxis on Mon 14th Feb 2011 23:25 UTC
Praxis
Member since:
2009-09-17

So the Nokia fanboys are saying that this was a great deal for Microsoft and Nokia got screwed, while the Microsoft fanboys are saying that Nokia got the best part of the deal. I've seen more people writing about the first scenario, than the second though.

Of course so far the only thing to come out the deal is a tanking stock price for Nokia.

Reply Score: 2

RE: Two Sides
by Thom_Holwerda on Mon 14th Feb 2011 23:32 in reply to "Two Sides"
Thom_Holwerda Member since:
2005-06-29

qOf course so far the only thing to come out the deal is a tanking stock price for Nokia.


Stock prices fell because Nokia finally admitted flat-out it's in deep shit - not because they made a deal with Microsoft.

Don't put so much faith in legalised gambli-- the stock market.

Edited 2011-02-14 23:33 UTC

Reply Parent Score: 1

RE[2]: Two Sides
by feeddllee on Tue 15th Feb 2011 08:46 in reply to "RE: Two Sides"
feeddllee Member since:
2011-02-15

Stock prices fell because Nokia finally admitted flat-out it's in deep shit - not because they made a deal with Microsoft.


Really ?

So the beating their stock got these past couple trading sessions has nothing to do with them announcing the EOL for the very cash cow (Symbian OS based phones) that accounts for about 30% of their revenue and proclaiming that they plan to sell 150 million of this very same devices in the next couple of years before killing it completely. Nope that could not have possibly played a role. Who would not want to buy these wonderful devices!

Of course the fact that they engendered so much ill will amongst a lot of the developers for their now defunct platform by reneging on the migration path they were promising them as recently as several weeks back has absolutely nothing to do with it either! Nope. Those developers really love to be screwed and they will buy yet another lie err promise from this very same people of riches to be had in the new "ecosystem" they are going to help foster.

Nope! None of these things played any role in their current predicament. It happened only because the market was so shocked by an a leaked internal memo that confirmed what was already known! Yep that is what hurt them! Told the world what the world already knew! Yeah, eh uh...

At this rate discussing the fact that Nokia has exactly zero leverage if this deal were to bear some fruit or nothing to fall back on if it were to fail would simply be a pointless exercise. We should all buy the spin management fed us the past couple of days, simply because you like WP7!

Don't put so much faith in legalised gambli-- the stock market.


Funny. I thought the very reason this type of ordeals are a common occurrence in the corporate world was to appease the very people you tell us not to "put so much faith" on ?

Reply Parent Score: 4

RE: Two Sides
by shmerl on Mon 14th Feb 2011 23:42 in reply to "Two Sides"
shmerl Member since:
2010-06-08

An obvious side benefit of Microsoft is hindering of Meego development and especially adoption. Potential advance of real Linux on Mobile (as well as Qt) threatens to backfire Microsoft on desktop too. Even if WP7 with Nokia wouldn't succeed at all, MS still gains taking out Nokia as a major manufacturer of Meego handsets for whatever time. Even though Intel is committed to stay with Meego, there are no handsets manufacturers so far who replaced Nokia's role in the project.

Edited 2011-02-14 23:44 UTC

Reply Parent Score: 4

RE[2]: Two Sides
by dsmogor on Tue 15th Feb 2011 09:48 in reply to "RE: Two Sides"
dsmogor Member since:
2005-09-01

True, esp. that MeeGo was (in contrast to Android) a real desktop os with switchable UI.

Reply Parent Score: 5

RE: Two Sides
by Delgarde on Tue 15th Feb 2011 00:36 in reply to "Two Sides"
Delgarde Member since:
2008-08-19

So the Nokia fanboys are saying that this was a great deal for Microsoft and Nokia got screwed, while the Microsoft fanboys are saying that Nokia got the best part of the deal. I've seen more people writing about the first scenario, than the second though.


Speaking as a fan of neither, I'd have to agree with the former group. On the face of it, Microsoft don't have anything to lose in this situation - at worst, WP7 continues in it's current position as a distant runner-up to the Android and iPhone platforms.

For Nokia, it's much more serious - they're pretty much betting their future on this. If it works, their new phones make them a player in the smartphone market. If not? Well, with smartphones rapidly moving down into even the budget market, they're pretty doomed if this fails.

Reply Parent Score: 5

RE[2]: Two Sides
by Praxis on Tue 15th Feb 2011 01:10 in reply to "RE: Two Sides"
Praxis Member since:
2009-09-17


Speaking as a fan of neither, I'd have to agree with the former group. On the face of it, Microsoft don't have anything to lose in this situation - at worst, WP7 continues in it's current position as a distant runner-up to the Android and iPhone platforms.


Well the biggest danger is that they scare away their other hardware partners. Why should HTC put more effort into wp7 when Nokia is getting all sorts of privileged access. This would cause wp7 to stall until Nokia actually ships a phone.

I still think Nokia has the bigger risk here, I'm simply don't think the risk scenarios for Microsoft proposed in this article are as serious as the article makes them sound. Except for the other oems abandon them one, they just don't sound that bad.

Reply Parent Score: 2