Linked by Thom Holwerda on Wed 16th Feb 2011 23:02 UTC
PDAs, Cellphones, Wireless "There's just one problem, though: the 'nine young investors' don't really exist - according to the last tweet on the @NokiaPlanB Twitter account, it was all a hoax perpetuated by 'one very bored engineer who really likes his iPhone'. Ouch."
Thread beginning with comment 462914
To view parent comment, click here.
To read all comments associated with this story, please click here.
RE[2]: I like WP7
by JohnJJ on Thu 17th Feb 2011 15:23 UTC in reply to "RE: I like WP7"
JohnJJ
Member since:
2011-01-28

I do not think anyone is arguing that the .Net platform is not a good platform.


No, but plenty of people are arguing that WP7 is a bad choice, but I'm not sure that Nokia had other viable alternatives.

Symbian is apparently not a very attractive platform and it has failed to deliver a proper user experience.

MeeGo is still not ready for prime time and it is uncertain when it will be ready. Betting on it could be dangerous.

iOS is of course not an option.

Choosing Android would give them a popular platform, but they would be just as much at the mercy of Google as all the other Android vendors currently are. Also maybe they feel, as many people suggest, that it would make them just another Android company.

WP7 is new, but has already established itself as a good platform and with the announces that MS just made, which Nokia have surely known about, it looks to be competitive with iOs and Android, feature wise, before the end of the year.
So I find that Nokias choice makes perfect sense.

I do however agree that they could have handled the annoucement better. It looks like Symbian is still going to be the basis for the lower end phones, so scaring off developers is probably not a good idea.

Reply Parent Score: 0

RE[3]: I like WP7
by _txf_ on Thu 17th Feb 2011 16:14 in reply to "RE[2]: I like WP7"
_txf_ Member since:
2008-03-17


MeeGo is still not ready for prime time and it is uncertain when it will be ready. Betting on it could be dangerous.


According to some, the platform was ready last year as it was harmattan/meego. What nokia feared was that there wouldn't be any apps ready for it. They also had no confidence in their ability to attract talent to the platform (despite the ready willingness of thousands of Qt developers and a couple of companies).

They chose the easy way out by leaving MS to do the hard work of attracting developers. They could have chosen to scrap it out with meego.



Choosing Android would give them a popular platform, but they would be just as much at the mercy of Google as all the other Android vendors currently are.

But now they are at the mercy of MS. Not only is the development environment completely closed, but they also have to pay to have access to the OS.

They said that they didn't want become a commodity hardware maker but inevitably that is what they will have to become even with WP7 in order to compete on price against android phones. Unless of course MS find some way to justify any premium one would pay for WP7 phones.


I do however agree that they could have handled the annoucement better. It looks like Symbian is still going to be the basis for the lower end phones, so scaring off developers is probably not a good idea.


Indeed. I still fail to see what they are going to use to replace symbian. They can't stick WP7 on lower end phones and S40 sucks. If they do stick WP7 on cheap phones then they also lose any premium appeal they need if they don't want to become a commodity hardware maker.

Reply Parent Score: 3

RE[4]: I like WP7
by nt_jerkface on Thu 17th Feb 2011 16:44 in reply to "RE[3]: I like WP7"
nt_jerkface Member since:
2009-08-26

They chose the easy way out by leaving MS to do the hard work of attracting developers. They could have chosen to scrap it out with meego.


I don't think there is an easy way out. At this point every option is a major risk.

But now they are at the mercy of MS. Not only is the development environment completely closed, but they also have to pay to have access to the OS.


I really doubt they have to pay for the OS. I read somewhere that MS is charging cell companies $10-15 per license.

Nokia is not at the mercy of MS, they can always switch to something else. It's an underdog team-up, Nokia needs MS and MS needs Nokia.

They said that they didn't want become a commodity hardware maker but inevitably that is what they will have to become even with WP7 in order to compete on price against android phones.


It's highly unlikely that they could have turned MeeGo into a premium platform to escape the upcoming margin war. They are known for quality hardware, cutting R&D costs and relying on their brand along with a lucrative deal from MS is the best way to go.

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE[4]: I like WP7
by JohnJJ on Thu 17th Feb 2011 16:47 in reply to "RE[3]: I like WP7"
JohnJJ Member since:
2011-01-28

According to some, the platform was ready last year...


According to Ars there is still some way to go: http://arstechnica.com/open-source/news/2011/02/hands-on-with-intel...

They chose the easy way out by leaving MS to do the hard work of attracting developers. They could have chosen to scrap it out with meego.


But why shouldn't they choose the easy way when their platform is burning ;) You don't make sticking with MeeGo sound like an attractive option.
I have to admit though, that my knowledge of MeeGo is quite limited, so I may be mistaken about its readiness. Also if Intel keeps backing it then it may still have a future.


But now they are at the mercy of MS. Not only is the development environment completely closed, but they also have to pay to have access to the OS.


True, but MS has also, in all its years, done one thing consistently right. It has stuck by its developers and the companies producing hardware for its platform. I don't think Nokia is in danger of being screwed by MS. MS is tough when it comes to competitors, but Nokia isn't a competitor.

My biggest current concern is the lack of side loading for applications. The iPhone has shown that people will not put up with this, so I fail to understand why MS chose the same route. I hope the "promises" they made related to the WP7 Chevron thing holds true, otherwise I'll probably get an Android next time.

Reply Parent Score: 1