Linked by Thom Holwerda on Mon 7th Mar 2011 23:21 UTC
Legal Well, how about some positive news to end this day? How about annoying the heck out of the Business Software Alliance? There's a new proposal for a directive on consumer rights in the EU, and in it, digital goods - software, online services, and so on - are explicitly defined as goods that are no different than any other good - like bread, watches, or cars. In other words, you would suddenly own the copies of software you buy, effectively declaring the EULA as a worthless piece of paper. Surprise - the BSA is not happy about this.
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RE: Um, I disagree
by Soulbender on Tue 8th Mar 2011 01:26 UTC in reply to "Um, I disagree"
Soulbender
Member since:
2005-08-18

It isn't clear how EU regulation would distinguish liability between the two components.


Well, right now no-one is liable so how is that good for the consumer?

But let's just understand that no regulation is completely benign.


Neither is any corporate entity so I guess they cancel out, eh?

Reply Parent Score: 6

RE[2]: Um, I disagree
by tomcat on Tue 8th Mar 2011 02:38 in reply to "RE: Um, I disagree"
tomcat Member since:
2006-01-06

"It isn't clear how EU regulation would distinguish liability between the two components.


Well, right now no-one is liable so how is that good for the consumer?
"

Competition -- not regulation -- makes software better.

"But let's just understand that no regulation is completely benign.


Neither is any corporate entity so I guess they cancel out, eh?
"

The market has certainly done a better job of delivering what consumers want than regulation.

Reply Parent Score: 3

RE[3]: Um, I disagree
by Soulbender on Tue 8th Mar 2011 03:42 in reply to "RE[2]: Um, I disagree"
Soulbender Member since:
2005-08-18

Competition -- not regulation -- makes software better.


If there's one thing we should learn from history it's that companies cares absolutely nada about consumers, their rights and their safety. There are countless examples of this. Rules and regulations are therefore necessary to protect the consumer. it really has nothing to do with creating better products since obviosuyl virtually every other industry manages to create better products while still being liable.

The market has certainly done a better job of delivering what consumers want than regulation.


Regulations are not about creating better prodcuts, it's about the consumers right with regads to flawed products.

Reply Parent Score: 14

RE[3]: Um, I disagree
by bert64 on Tue 8th Mar 2011 11:39 in reply to "RE[2]: Um, I disagree"
bert64 Member since:
2007-04-23

Some regulation is required to ensure competition, otherwise one player will swallow up all the smaller players thus creating a monopoly which is too big for anyone else to compete with.

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE[3]: Um, I disagree
by wannabe geek on Tue 8th Mar 2011 21:38 in reply to "RE[2]: Um, I disagree"
wannabe geek Member since:
2006-09-27

Competition -- not regulation -- makes software better.


Exactly! I cringe when politicians want to introduce yet more industry regulation. How did that work for the Soviets?

I'm also weary of software being treated just like physical goods. I oppose so-called "intellectual property", especially patents,. The EULAs would be fine by me, if they were just a contract between the user and the vendor, like an NDA, but not affecting third parties who didn't agree to it. It would be much better if "closed source" software companies based their business model on software-as-a-service and secrecy (like Google does). But then reverse engineering would have to be fair game.

All in all, I guess this time I side with (YUCK) the BSA.

Reply Parent Score: 2