Linked by David Adams on Tue 7th Jun 2011 17:54 UTC
Editorial Bob Cringeley makes a bold statement in a blog post responding to Apple's iCloud announcement: "Jobs is going to sacrifice the Macintosh in order to kill Windows." He says, "The incumbent platform today is Windows because it is in Windows machines that nearly all of our data and our ability to use that data have been trapped. But the Apple announcement changes all that. Suddenly the competition isn't about platforms at all, but about data, with that data being crunched on a variety of platforms through the use of cheap downloaded apps."
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RE: Give me a break...
by demetrioussharpe on Wed 8th Jun 2011 19:05 UTC in reply to "Give me a break..."
demetrioussharpe
Member since:
2009-01-09

Give me a break. Apple and it's 5% market share could not kill Windows no matter how much they tried. And the competition has never been about platforms. It's been about applications. And the iCloud is not going to change that. Windows is still going to rule the applications market.


Apple doesn't want to kill Windows for the same reason that Lamborghini doesn't want to kill Ford. Both products do the same as their respective competitors, but there's an air of perceived exoticness of the one that's more expensive & less owned. This is how price tags are allowed to stay higher, regardless of the opinion of someone who isn't a customer. No matter what people think, Apple's making a nice chunk of change with it's prices & that's all that really matters. You don't have to have the highest marketshare to have higher profit margins. Profit margins are what counts, not marketshare.

Reply Parent Score: 1

RE[2]: Give me a break...
by pantheraleo on Wed 8th Jun 2011 20:12 in reply to "RE: Give me a break..."
pantheraleo Member since:
2007-03-07

You don't have to have the highest marketshare to have higher profit margins. Profit margins are what counts, not marketshare.


That's not completely true when it comes to computing platforms. If you don't have marketshare, it makes it harder to attract third party developers for the platform. And without third party developers, platforms don't survive.

Granted, Apple attracts enough third party developers to keep the Mac platform alive. But the amount of software available for Mac is minuscule compared to the amount of software available for Windows.

Reply Parent Score: 3