Linked by Thom Holwerda on Thu 16th Jun 2011 22:55 UTC, submitted by lucas_maximus
Linux In a blog post today, Adobe's Director of Open Source and Standards said: "we will be focusing on supporting partner implementations and will no longer be releasing our own versions of Adobe AIR and the AIR SDK for desktop Linux". McAllister says that "way back in 1999" he'd predicted "a significant market for desktop Linux by 2005. Obviously I was wrong. So we, Adobe, also need to shift with the market." Source code for AIR will be made available to partners so they can make their own Linux implementations if they so desire. Is there anyone in the audience who cares about no more AIR on Linux from Adobe? Anyone...?
Thread beginning with comment 477794
To view parent comment, click here.
To read all comments associated with this story, please click here.
pantheraleo
Member since:
2007-03-07

Though the significance of AIR is rather low, pulling the support of any application from any operating system is akin to recommending to all users that they not use that operating system.


To me, it's actually akin to recommending that users not use the technology that is being pulled. But that is something I've been evangelizing for a long time now. If you are a Web application developer, especially one trying to sell SAAS to other businesses, you are a fool if you develop the client side of your application using Flash or Flex (which of course, requires Flash). The reason is simple. Sooner or later, you are going to run into a potential customer who's corporate IT security policy forbids Flash on their workstations. And when you do, that's going to cost you a potential customer.

It's far better to stick with AJAX and powerful Javascript libraries that ensure your application will run on any browser without requiring a plugin that potential customers may or may not allow on their systems.

Also, with both Firefox and Chrome adding "desktop application" modes to their browsers, you can do the same thing using Javascript that you could do with Air.

Edited 2011-06-19 22:38 UTC

Reply Parent Score: 2

bfr99 Member since:
2007-03-15

Assuming for the sake of argument that say a Flash solution is the best technically for a given client you advocate not using it because some future hypothetical client might object. I don't agree with this philosophy.

Reply Parent Score: 1

pantheraleo Member since:
2007-03-07

Assuming for the sake of argument that say a Flash solution is the best technically for a given client you advocate not using it because some future hypothetical client might object. I don't agree with this philosophy.


If you are building software specifically for a given client, and that client is paying you to develop the software for them, that's a different story. The client owns the rights to the software you develop then. In that case, if the client allows flash, and it's a good fit. Then go ahead and use it.

I'm talking something where you develop a more generalized solution to a business problem that you might want to try to sell to 50, 100, or more customers. Think of it this way, if Google Apps, and GMail were written in Flash instead of Javascript, that would be a deal breaker for some potential business customers that don't allow Flash.

I'm talking software more along those types of lines. You may not have any customers when you develop the software. You plan to sell it to them as a service after you have developed it. In that case, it's foolish to use flash / flex. Because not all businesses allow flash. So some future customers might reject your software because it requires flash.

Edited 2011-06-20 21:47 UTC

Reply Parent Score: 2