Linked by Thom Holwerda on Mon 31st Oct 2011 12:25 UTC
Linux "Red Hat, Canonical and the Linux Foundation have laid out a set of recommendations for hardware vendors in hopes of preserving the ability to install Linux on Windows 8 machines. Windows 8 machines should ship in a setup mode giving users more control right off the bat, the groups argue." Group hug-cheer combo for Red Hat, Canonical, and the Linux Foundation please.
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Them are fighting words...
by transami on Mon 31st Oct 2011 13:46 UTC
transami
Member since:
2006-02-28

I can't believe Microsoft is getting away with this. Talk about you monopolistic powers. Where are the consumer protection agencies? Getting their palms greased, I'm sure.

Are hackers going to have to form PC-lynch mobs and bust PCs in the streets to stop this?

Reply Score: 7

RE: Them are fighting words...
by twitterfire on Mon 31st Oct 2011 14:47 in reply to "Them are fighting words..."
twitterfire Member since:
2008-09-11

Stop what exactly?

What are you blaming MS for? They recommend hardware vendors to implement secure boot in UEFI in order to use "Windows 8 ready" logo but they don't require secure boot to be enabled by default. Nobody stops hardware vendors to allow secure boot to be disabled.

Reply Parent Score: -1

Alfman Member since:
2011-01-28

twitterfire,

"...but they don't require secure boot to be enabled by default. Nobody stops hardware vendors to allow secure boot to be disabled."

I would like a citation for that because that seems to be a new piece of information. Will windows run normally without any restrictions if secure boot is disabled?

Reply Parent Score: 5

Soulbender Member since:
2005-08-18

but they don't require secure boot to be enabled by default.


Actually, that's exactly what they do require if the vendor wants to have the "Designed for Windows 8" logo.
This anti-competitive practice isn't going to sit well in many parts of the world though.

Reply Parent Score: 15

Morgan Member since:
2005-06-29

...they don't require secure boot to be enabled by default.


Maybe not yet. Perhaps when Windows 9 rolls around though, and all modern computers have the Secure Boot feature, we will see a dialog during the Windows install process that says something like "In order to continue installing, please *click here* to turn on Secure Boot." Since the vast majority of users, even power users, will simply click and not think about it, it's entirely possible that Microsoft will not only turn it on but insert code that prevents it being turned back off for other OSes.

Then again, it could end up like the Pentium III processor serial number debacle: One BIOS update to turn it off by default in the original boards and it's never heard of again.

Reply Parent Score: 2