Linked by Thom Holwerda on Thu 3rd Nov 2011 19:34 UTC, submitted by lucas_maximus
Hardware, Embedded Systems A big issue right now in the world of operating systems - especially Linux - is Microsoft's requirement that all Windows 8 machines ship with UEFI's secure boot enabled, with no requirement that OEMs implement it so users can turn it off. This has caused some concern in the Linux world, and considering Microsoft's past and current business practices and the incompetence of OEMs, that's not unwarranted. CNet's Ed Bott decided to pose the issue to OEMs. Dell stated is has plans to include the option to turn secure boot off, while HP was a bit more vague about the issue.
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Comment by AnythingButVista
by AnythingButVista on Thu 3rd Nov 2011 22:12 UTC
AnythingButVista
Member since:
2008-08-27

I'm almost positive of what HP will do.

Business PC's: You'll have the option to install alternate OS's, whether it's disabling UEFI or by providing keys for other OS's.

Consumer PC's: Windows 8 is all you'll get. DEAL WITH IT! Just like HP refused to provide drivers so consumers could downgrade Vista machines to XP, don't expect to be able to replace Windows 8 with any other Windows, let alone Linux or other OS's.

Reply Score: 3

RE: Comment by AnythingButVista
by zlynx on Thu 3rd Nov 2011 22:44 in reply to "Comment by AnythingButVista"
zlynx Member since:
2005-07-20

10 years ago PCs were mostly around $1,000.

Today you can get cheaper options, yet people still want them to have all the features of the $1,000 machines.

People, you get what you pay for. Live with it.

If you have to spend $1,000 on a business class PC in order to get decent features, then you aren't any worse off than you were in the year 2000.

If you buy a $350 PC, it's going to be locked down, not have an install CD, come with annoying preinstalled software, and in the future probably be locked so you can't even get rid of the crapware.

Reply Parent Score: 2

shmerl Member since:
2010-06-08

In the end of course you can assemble your own machine, getting a motherboard with sane BIOS, and avoiding all this junk. But that's not the point. The point is a principle of having a choice for the user of any machine, not just the one you assembled on your own. It doesn't matter whether it costs $350 or $1000. Lower price doesn't mandate crippling the device in regards of user's control.

Edited 2011-11-03 22:50 UTC

Reply Parent Score: 3

Thomas2005 Member since:
2005-11-07

I'm almost positive of what HP will do.

Business PC's: You'll have the option to install alternate OS's, whether it's disabling UEFI or by providing keys for other OS's.

Consumer PC's: Windows 8 is all you'll get. DEAL WITH IT! Just like HP refused to provide drivers so consumers could downgrade Vista machines to XP, don't expect to be able to replace Windows 8 with any other Windows, let alone Linux or other OS's.

This is exactly what I am thinking, except "HP" can be substituted with any OEM. A slight variation on the consumer PC is there will be an "enthusiast" model that costs more, just for the ability to disable SecureBoot, or it will have Windows 8 "The Shiznit" edition to help justify the cost.

Reply Parent Score: 3