Linked by David Adams on Sun 6th Nov 2011 04:35 UTC, submitted by twitterfire
Linux Linux advocates have for so long advocated browser-accessed software as a service as a way to break out of Microsoft's proprietary desktop. Now that this world has arrived, there's less incentive to work on native Linux apps.
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This is a bad thing?
by orestes on Sun 6th Nov 2011 05:13 UTC
orestes
Member since:
2005-07-06

The sooner we get to the point no one gives a damn, or has to for that matter, about the underlying OS their software runs on the better as far as I'm concerned.

Reply Score: 2

RE: This is a bad thing?
by ssokolow on Sun 6th Nov 2011 06:57 in reply to "This is a bad thing?"
ssokolow Member since:
2010-01-21

The sooner we get to the point no one gives a damn, or has to for that matter, about the underlying OS their software runs on the better as far as I'm concerned.


That's all well and good for you, but I have a fairly strict policy to only rely on web applications if they inherently do something that's not feasible to do natively.

Google or LibraryThing or Last.fm are, by nature, tools that get their value from their network effects, so I'll excuse that.

However, I'm now willing to commit myself to so many single points of failure (network connectivity, continued interest in the product on the provider's part, provider uptime, potential differences of opinion regarding the importance of various potential features, etc.) for an application for which the only benefit of being in the browser is that I don't have to worry about my update manager distracting me with a password prompt.

Reply Parent Score: 7

RE[2]: This is a bad thing?
by Fergy on Sun 6th Nov 2011 07:14 in reply to "RE: This is a bad thing?"
Fergy Member since:
2006-04-10

However, I'm now willing to commit myself to so many single points of failure (network connectivity, continued interest in the product on the provider's part, provider uptime, potential differences of opinion regarding the importance of various potential features, etc.)

I would think that webapps in the future will be able to run offline and be packaged in a download.
I guess when they solve those 2 problems you'll love webapps?

Reply Parent Score: 1