Linked by David Adams on Sun 6th Nov 2011 04:35 UTC, submitted by twitterfire
Linux Linux advocates have for so long advocated browser-accessed software as a service as a way to break out of Microsoft's proprietary desktop. Now that this world has arrived, there's less incentive to work on native Linux apps.
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Dual Views
by runjorel on Sun 6th Nov 2011 14:53 UTC
runjorel
Member since:
2009-02-09

I love how this article was posted right after the "Support Linux by Not Writing Linux-Only Software" news item was posted in the News section. It puts together two good points of view. I have to agree however that cross platform development is better.

One example given in the article, "Support Linux by Not Writing Linux-Only Software" talks about a user frustrated that AppX does not exist in Linux like it did in Windows. Now that user just wants to go back to AppX in Windows or Mac OS X because that is what they are familiar with even though the Linux variant may be 10 times better! Sure education could solve this problem, but computers have become such a commodity appliance that people don't want to 'learn computers', they just want to use it.

While I think the Linux ecosystem already has some killer apps in general, I think the only way for general users to actually use Linux is for developers to utilize cross platform development. It would ease the transition for new users in a new OS, which let's face it, can be tough for some. Maybe if more popular cross platform software existed in Linux, people would actually INSTALL Linux instead of run it on a live CD or running it in a VM where it can easily be turned off and never turned on again.

What I would love to see however is a better cross development platform. Java is too bulky. Mono is a great alternative, but is also very biased. Flash wouldn't be so bad if it weren't such a performance hog. The web is awesome (HTML 5, etc.) in that just about anyone can code an app, but it's naturally sandboxed (although that's changing too). But that's another soapbox to get on for another time.

Regardless, I am not sure if Linux-Only software is the way to go...although I must admit my little nerdy heart desires for people to move to Linux because of apps...not because they're running away from OSX/Windows.

Reply Score: 1

RE: Dual Views
by ilovebeer on Sun 6th Nov 2011 18:23 in reply to "Dual Views"
ilovebeer Member since:
2011-08-08

Regardless, I am not sure if Linux-Only software is the way to go...although I must admit my little nerdy heart desires for people to move to Linux because of apps...not because they're running away from OSX/Windows.

If you would like users to switch to Linux then you _should_ support the idea of Linux-only software. There's a catch however. Cross-platform software doesn't create any motivation to migrate OS'es. Why would it? Why would a user install a completely new OS when he/she can use the same software on the currently installed OS?

Linux has tons of mediocre-to-crap but very little "great" software. Linux needs oustanding Linux-only software that has no equivalent or is at least on par with rival software. Linux offers very little of that and thus very little reason to take it seriously as a Windows alternative.

Reply Parent Score: -1

RE[2]: Dual Views
by westlake on Sun 6th Nov 2011 19:52 in reply to "RE: Dual Views"
westlake Member since:
2010-01-07

Linux has tons of mediocre-to-crap but very little "great" software. Linux needs oustanding Linux-only software that has no equivalent or is at least on par with rival software. Linux offers very little of that and thus very little reason to take it seriously as a Windows alternative.


But --- if you are talking about end-user applications --- how do you get there outside of serving very small niche markets?

The native clients for OSX and Windows should deliver about 99% of potential sales.

Even the FOSS developer can feel the itch for greater visibility and better funding.

The stats on the latest [and to my mind the weakest] "Humble Bundle" shows Linux sales generating a bare 25% of revenues while contributons from Linux gamers average about twice that from those running Windows.

http://www.humblebundle.com/

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE[2]: Dual Views
by Soulbender on Mon 7th Nov 2011 18:38 in reply to "RE: Dual Views"
Soulbender Member since:
2005-08-18

If you would like users to switch to Linux then you _should_ support the idea of Linux-only software. There's a catch however.


If he supports Linux-only apps there is no catch, at least not the catch you mention.

Linux has tons of mediocre-to-crap but very little "great" software.


So it's just like Windows, only with much less crap and mediocre software. One look at, say, Tucows confirms this without a doubt. There are great Linux software, there are great Windows software and great OSX software etc. Perhaps Linux has less, perhaps not. The only "great" software Windows has that I need are games. There's not one other piece of software Windows has that I need. That's just me though, it will be different for everyone and depend greatly what you do with your computer.

Reply Parent Score: 4