Linked by snydeq on Tue 8th Nov 2011 01:29 UTC
BSD and Darwin derivatives Deep End's Paul Venezia wonders why more folks aren't using FreeBSD on the desktop. 'There used to be a saying -- at least I've said it many times -- that my workstations run Linux, my servers run FreeBSD. Sure, it's quicker to build a Linux box, do a "yum install x y z" and toss it out into the wild as a fully functional server, but the extra time required to really get a FreeBSD box tuned will come back in spades through performance and stability metrics. You'll get more out of the hardware, be that virtual or physical, than you will on a generic Linux binary installation.'
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RE[5]: I agree, 10 years ago.
by f0dder on Tue 8th Nov 2011 22:10 UTC in reply to "RE[4]: I agree, 10 years ago."
f0dder
Member since:
2009-08-05

Also, Rails is only popular because of Ruby (the language),
You mean, "Ruby is only popular because of Rails" :-)

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE[6]: I agree, 10 years ago.
by tuma324 on Tue 8th Nov 2011 23:04 in reply to "RE[5]: I agree, 10 years ago."
tuma324 Member since:
2010-04-09

"Also, Rails is only popular because of Ruby (the language),
You mean, "Ruby is only popular because of Rails" :-) "

Yeah or that, but the reason Rails is nice is because of the language IMHO.

Many people have implemented Rails-like frameworks in other languages, but I always go back to Ruby for some reason.

I find the language quite pleasant to use, its object model is very carefully made, regular expressions built in into the language, etc. Ruby feels a lot like Perl and Python combined IMHO.

I also prefer more minimalistic frameworks in Ruby, like: Rack, Sinatra, Ramaze, Sequel.

I prefer to work with frameworks/libraries that can be decoupled easily. Rails is too "big" for my taste.

Edited 2011-11-08 23:16 UTC

Reply Parent Score: 2