Linked by David Adams on Tue 22nd Nov 2011 03:49 UTC
Google With the announcement of its new Search app, Google gave iPad users more than just a slick and well-made native search app that bests the experience on any Android tablet. It also managed to squeeze the core elements of Chrome OS into Apple's ecosystem.
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RE[3]: What a stupid article.
by rhavyn on Tue 22nd Nov 2011 17:36 UTC in reply to "RE[2]: What a stupid article."
rhavyn
Member since:
2005-07-06

The same happend with the iPhone, it too had a really large market share of newly sold smartphones. Now Android is the dominant one.


Except, that's a myth. The iPhone didn't start with a large market share, see here: http://www.asymco.com/wp-content/uploads/2011/10/Screen-Shot-2011-1.... One could argue the iPhone has never had a large market share and not even Apple would disagree with that, I think.

On the other hand, there are two markets that Apple entered fairly early and quickly dominated: portable music players and tablets. Personally I think the market landscape of the iPad looks a lot closer to the iPod than the iPhone.

Reply Parent Score: 1

RE[4]: What a stupid article.
by Lennie on Tue 22nd Nov 2011 17:54 in reply to "RE[3]: What a stupid article."
Lennie Member since:
2007-09-22

When the first iPhone came out the market of touchscreen smartphones was really small. Almost all other products from that time are now considered 'feature phones' (like the Nokia, old Windows Phone and old Blackberry devices that are listed in the graph).

The iPhone became pretty popular in a short time, right ?

There might have been a few others like the "Prada". But that was a bit of a niche product too I would guess.

Maybe my memory is wrong, I didn't follow the market all that closely.

Edited 2011-11-22 17:55 UTC

Reply Parent Score: 1

RE[5]: What a stupid article.
by rhavyn on Tue 22nd Nov 2011 20:49 in reply to "RE[4]: What a stupid article."
rhavyn Member since:
2005-07-06

When the first iPhone came out the market of touchscreen smartphones was really small.


Except there is no "touchscreen smartphone" market, there is just a smartphone market. When the iPhone came out BlackBerry, Symbian and Windows Mobile were already established players with large install bases. The iPhone has grown quickly but it has never been a dominant player in the smartphone market.

And, again, this is categorically different from the iPod and iPad. In both of those cases, Apple was a fairly early entrant in a very small market which they were quickly able to dominate. No one has been able to touch the iPod and that market became basically Apple and a few small companies that could afford to live on low sales of niche devices. The question is, will the iPad market move in that direction? And if it doesn't, will the current players (Samsung, Asus, Acer, HP, etc.) be willing to play in a low volume market?

Reply Parent Score: 1

RE[4]: What a stupid article.
by Laurence on Tue 22nd Nov 2011 21:51 in reply to "RE[3]: What a stupid article."
Laurence Member since:
2007-03-26


On the other hand, there are two markets that Apple entered fairly early and quickly dominated: portable music players and tablets. Personally I think the market landscape of the iPad looks a lot closer to the iPod than the iPhone.

Apple didn't enter early in those markets either.
Portable music players (walkmans et al) had been around for at least a decade before the iPod and MP3 players had been around a few years as well. What Apple had done was popularise an existing geeky product at around the time when the general populous was looking for the next big music platform. While some could argue they created a market there, they certainly weren't the 1st to market - not by a long stretch.

It's a similar case with tablets. Slates and tablet PCs had been around for a decade before the iPad. However in this instance Apple had the brand image from the iPhone that could push their own tablet. In this instance though, plenty of hardware and software vendors (and Apple included) had tried to create a market there for years prior to the iPad and failed. In fact, I'd openly said I expected the iPad to fail as well but clearly it didn't. So to Apple's credit, they really did create an industry there where nobody else could.

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE[5]: What a stupid article.
by rhavyn on Tue 22nd Nov 2011 23:00 in reply to "RE[4]: What a stupid article."
rhavyn Member since:
2005-07-06

"
On the other hand, there are two markets that Apple entered fairly early and quickly dominated: portable music players and tablets. Personally I think the market landscape of the iPad looks a lot closer to the iPod than the iPhone.

Apple didn't enter early in those markets either.
Portable music players (walkmans et al) had been around for at least a decade before the iPod and MP3 players had been around a few years as well. What Apple had done was popularise an existing geeky product at around the time when the general populous was looking for the next big music platform. While some could argue they created a market there, they certainly weren't the 1st to market - not by a long stretch.
"

I'm not sure if you're disagreeing with me or not. I clearly didn't say they were first, I said they were fairly early. And for the portable MP3 player market, they were. I mean, they were competing with devices like the Diamond Rio 500, IIRC. In any case, it was still a tiny market and they quickly dominated it.

It's a similar case with tablets. Slates and tablet PCs had been around for a decade before the iPad. However in this instance Apple had the brand image from the iPhone that could push their own tablet. In this instance though, plenty of hardware and software vendors (and Apple included) had tried to create a market there for years prior to the iPad and failed. In fact, I'd openly said I expected the iPad to fail as well but clearly it didn't. So to Apple's credit, they really did create an industry there where nobody else could.


I agree, it is a similar case, which is why I think looking at the iPod is a better example than looking at the iPhone for how the tablet market will shake out.

Reply Parent Score: 1