Linked by Thom Holwerda on Wed 4th Jan 2012 18:28 UTC
PDAs, Cellphones, Wireless Hold on to your panties, because this should come as a surprise: I'm actually agreeing that Samsung is copying Apple. The Korean company just released a new entry-level Android smartphone, and it's called the Samsung Galaxy Ace Plus. While Apple's previous complaints regarding Samsung's supposed copying were obviously nonsense, this Galaxy Ace Plus, on the other hand... It's almost as if Samsung is giving Apple the finger by copying the iPhone 3G(S) almost verbatim.
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RE: Its a cultural thing
by unclefester on Thu 5th Jan 2012 04:37 UTC in reply to "Its a cultural thing"
unclefester
Member since:
2007-01-13


It is, to a large extent, a cultural thing. Asian mentality in this regard is totally different than western mentality. For most Asian entrepreneurs, anything that is producable is a feasable product, patented technology or not. Its just not in their mindset to take IP into account. If you can make it, anything goes, no matter the consequences. If it generates profit, you produce it, as simple as that.


Typical racist bullshit.

A huge portion of European industry in the 18th and 19th century was devoted to making copies of Chinese and Japanese goods - particularly porcelain, furniture, paintings and lacquer work. Much of this fakery was passed of as authentic to the unsuspecting European public.

In case you aren't aware almost every useful early western technology including irrigation, windmills, paper, moveable type printing, banknotes, firearms, gunpowder, rockets, porcelain, navigation, map making, alchemy and algebra were all copied from Asia and the Middle east.

Edited 2012-01-05 04:38 UTC

Reply Parent Score: 6

RE[2]: Its a cultural thing
by frderi on Thu 5th Jan 2012 21:36 in reply to "RE: Its a cultural thing"
frderi Member since:
2011-06-17


Typical racist bullshit.


Typical meaningless leftist elitist snob antipose, skipping...


A huge portion of European industry in the 18th and 19th century was devoted to making copies of Chinese and Japanese goods - particularly porcelain, furniture, paintings and lacquer work. Much of this fakery was passed of as authentic to the unsuspecting European public.

In case you aren't aware almost every useful early western technology including irrigation, windmills, paper, moveable type printing, banknotes, firearms, gunpowder, rockets, porcelain, navigation, map making, alchemy and algebra were all copied from Asia and the Middle east.


You seem a bit confused. You are comparing basic materials and techniques with complex technological equipment. The techniques you mention did not cost hundreds of millions of dollars to develop and what you mention was often invented in the world concurrently. However, even if you comparison would make sense, its still a very one lopped one. Before IP laws, global trade was largely protected by keeping certain aspects of production under lock and key. Which the Chinese protected arguably at even more as vigurously as any other economical power, which is understating things quite a bit.

Porcelain was a very lucrative export product for the Chinese for several centuries for which they charged exorbirant prices, its production secrets guarded closely to protect their monopoly. The same was true for tea and silk, which both literally had to be pryed out of their hands before they were made available to the world. We do not have to owe any "thanks" to the Chinese for them, since they were not given to us in the first place. The only thing the Chinese were interested to trade them for was plain hard cash in the form of silver, foreigners were not even allowed to enter China let alone trade western products there.

By the way, Delft porcelain as made in Europe had its own distinctive style and became popular after chinese import became unavailable for trade after the fall of the Ming dynasty. Prior, Chinese porcelain was widely traded by western merchants and made it to Japan by the hands of the Dutch, which bacame one of the first porcelain producing countries outside of China. We are, however, still talking 16th century now.

If you're that keen in diving into 18th and 19th century history, you might want to have a look at the industrial revolution, propelled by the Watt steam engine, an English invention, the electrical motor, also from English soil; the first battery, an Italian invention, the first electrical cirquit, a German invention, before we move on to the icons in electrical engineering from the second half of the 19th century like Nicolai Tesla, Thomas Edison, Graham Bell and Ernst Werner von Siemens for your share of innovations which are closer to the field of technology we are currently discussing.

Other noteworthy 18th century events are the Anglo-Chinese wars, which show the Chinese long-standing knack at enforcing trade deficits.

And, since we live in the present after all, China's huge trade surplusses, or its leadership in counterfeiting, which accounts for 8% of its GDP.

Reply Parent Score: 0

RE[3]: Its a cultural thing
by unclefester on Fri 6th Jan 2012 01:14 in reply to "RE[2]: Its a cultural thing"
unclefester Member since:
2007-01-13

The reality is that westerners weren't even able to make very high quality copies of many Chinese and Japanese products. No western company has ever created ceramic or enamel work to the same standards as the Chinese or Japanese master craftsmen. Louis Faberge (of enamel Easter egg fame) was considered second rate by the leading Japanese enamel craftsmen.

If you think Delft pottery compares in anyway to Chinese porcelain you have rocks in your head. Delft may have be distinctive but it was crudely made rubbish.

The average western isn't aware that the Chinese and Japanese make many extraordinarily high quality original products. The top Japanese and Chinese hand made mechanical watches make any Rolex or Omega look like a piece of over-priced mass-produced junk (which in reality they are) in comparison.

Western countries obtained access to Chinese and Japanese technology by literally invading the countries and stealing their trade secrets.

Britain used genuine government-backed pirates (privateers) to threaten Canton and seize Hong Kong by force. These pirates then demanded that Chinese accept opium in exchange for tea and manufactured goods.

In the case of Japan Commodore Peary threatened to send 700 warships from San Francisco (a bluff) to destroy Edo (Tokyo) unless immediate access to Japanese trade was granted.

The reality is that the Asian countries have already passed the west in many technologies. The Koreans are the best steelmakers and shipbuilders. The Japanese make the best optics (most professional microscopes and endoscopes are made by Minolta). The Japanese can even obtain measurably superior sports car performance than Porsche (Nissan GTR) or Ferrari (Lexus LFA) without significantly compromising comfort or reliability.

Edited 2012-01-06 01:20 UTC

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE[3]: Its a cultural thing
by unclefester on Fri 6th Jan 2012 04:40 in reply to "RE[2]: Its a cultural thing"
unclefester Member since:
2007-01-13

The Chinese didn't stop trade with the west as a part of a nefarious plan. The real reason was that the West had very little worthwhile to offer. Most Western products in the 1840s were mass produced consumer junk - tinware, crude stamped pottery etc - all products that the Chinese could produce cheaper and better. Why would any sane person swap Chinese tea (worth thousands of dollars a kilo in today's money) for some crappy English pottery or coarse wool cloth?

The Chinese also had no need for steam engines as labour was very cheap.

Your idea that inventions spring fully formed after spending millions on research is ludicrous. All R&D is really little more than a refinement of existing ideas (virtually all of which were originally discovered by accident and tinkering).

James Watt didn't invent the steam engine he merely improved the existing century year old designs. Before that he made counterfeits of expensive German flutes.

The electric motor concept was discovered by accident when two hand operated generators were accidently connected to each other. The EMF was also originally discovered by accident.

Reply Parent Score: 2