Linked by Thom Holwerda on Mon 20th Feb 2012 11:22 UTC
Hardware, Embedded Systems No matter where you look these days, there's a profound sense here in the west that the people no longer having any tangible control over what our governments do. Sure, we are allowed to vote every once in a while, but effectively, most of our countries are governed by backroom deals and corporate interests. If matters really do get out of hand, how do we fight this? Well, with technology of course!
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Western Democracy
by ParadoxUncreated on Tue 21st Feb 2012 00:09 UTC
ParadoxUncreated
Member since:
2009-12-05

One thing I could never understand about the west is that they allow in a democracy, banks that get three houses each time you get one. Nobody needs that skewed marketforce. Atleast in Iran they have understood this, and have no interest on loans. Thats a place to start anyway.

Reply Score: 1

RE: Western Democracy
by Bill Shooter of Bul on Wed 22nd Feb 2012 14:59 in reply to "Western Democracy"
Bill Shooter of Bul Member since:
2006-07-14

While its difficult for people to understand proper moderation and regulation, I'll try anyways.

Without getting interest on a loan, the party making the loan has no incentive to give the money in the first place. Especially if there is a non negligible inflation rate. Your $100,000 loan taken out in 1970 was able to buy a lot more than it was in 2000, when a conventional 30 Year mortgage would be repaid.

Now, what caused the financial crisis in the United states then? Well, greed obviously. Instead of charging a fixed rate, banks made loans to people with adjustable rates. They also stopped actually sufficiently investigating if people could pay for the loans, also bad. So all of a sudden those rates went up all at once for a large section of the people who took out loans, and they couldn't pay. Meltdown achieved due to excessive greed and lack of adequate regulations, and a poor understanding of math.

There is nothing wrong with a properly regulated market economy. The tough part is the "properly regulated" part, finding the balance between market forces and regulation is difficult both academically and politically,

Reply Parent Score: 2