Linked by Thom Holwerda on Sat 24th Mar 2012 16:43 UTC
Internet & Networking "The Pirate Bay is not only the most visited BitTorrent site on the Internet, but arguably the most censored too. Many ISPs have been ordered to block their customers’ access to the website, and recently Microsoft joined in on the action by stopping people sharing its location with others. Microsoft's Windows Live Messenger now refuses to pass on links to The Pirate Bay website, claiming they are unsafe." They refuse links to The Pirate Bay. In that light, here are a bunch of completely and utterly useless links to The Pirate Bay. And some more. And then some. Update: We have some more links to The Pirate Bay.
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Break some laws
by KrustyVader on Sat 24th Mar 2012 17:09 UTC
KrustyVader
Member since:
2006-10-28

In Argentina doing so is against the law unless you have a court order. Is like interfering/reading someone else mail o a phone call. Is like if i use the phone's company for my personal use, i can be punished for doing it but the should not interfere with the conversation.

Any kind of communication that you block is against the law. And ISP blocking other ISP is not allowed, and ISP blocking some kind of traffic is not allowed (but everybody does once in a while for a short time).

But the problem is that Argentina has great laws... but no enforcement at all.

Reply Score: 5

RE: Break some laws
by shotsman on Sun 25th Mar 2012 06:21 in reply to "Break some laws"
shotsman Member since:
2005-07-22

No, the problem is not with Argentina and its laws.

The problem lies with the USA and its laws.
There is a law in the US that extends jurisdiction of US Laws to every part of the world. As a US Company, Microsoft has to obey US Law EVERYWHERE it operates.

You have to realise that

US LAW trumps local laws and there is nothing your local Government can do about it unless they want to be invaded by the US.

Uncle Sam - There is no hiding place
Uncle Sam - Big Brother 2012 style.

Now all I have to do is wait for the Feds to start extradition proceedings against me (no evidence needed btw).

Reply Parent Score: 1

RE[2]: Break some laws
by chripun on Sun 25th Mar 2012 15:00 in reply to "RE: Break some laws"
chripun Member since:
2008-08-25

No, the problem is not with Argentina and its laws.

The problem lies with the USA and its laws.
There is a law in the US that extends jurisdiction of US Laws to every part of the world. As a US Company, Microsoft has to obey US Law EVERYWHERE it operates.

You have to realise that

US LAW trumps local laws and there is nothing your local Government can do about it unless they want to be invaded by the US.

Uncle Sam - There is no hiding place
Uncle Sam - Big Brother 2012 style.

Now all I have to do is wait for the Feds to start extradition proceedings against me (no evidence needed btw).


I thought U.S. meant "you ass" ... ;)
It seems that's the body part they use to think up new laws.
I wouldn't worry too much about this given the fact that our new overlords the Chinese are all for pirating and don't care for copyright.
Besides, pirating is good for our planet as shown in the following graph:
http://www.seanbonner.com/blog/archives/001857.php

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE[2]: Break some laws
by cyrilleberger on Mon 26th Mar 2012 06:33 in reply to "RE: Break some laws"
cyrilleberger Member since:
2006-02-01

US LAW trumps local laws and there is nothing your local Government can do about it unless they want to be invaded by the US.

It gets funny when the US gets unhappy that the EU does the same ;) (with the carbon tax for airplanes companies that want to be able to land in Europe)

Reply Parent Score: 5