Linked by Thom Holwerda on Wed 9th May 2012 02:02 UTC
Mac OS X "Dragging and dropping is a great way to get stuff done on your Mac, but DragonDrop makes it even better. DragonDrop lets you set down what you're dragging, leaving you free to find your destination without worrying about keeping the mouse button held down." Great utility (found via Daring Fireball), but shaking with the mouse is a horrible interaction - it's very intensive and error-prone (Aero Shake, anyone?). I'd love for that little drop container to be permanently visible (oh, and a Windows/Linux version would be awesome, of course).
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RE[5]: Comment by Drumhellar
by Kochise on Thu 10th May 2012 04:22 UTC in reply to "RE[4]: Comment by Drumhellar"
Kochise
Member since:
2006-03-03

It's notabout trolling, it's about which OS performs better for the average user. If Windows and OS X suceeded in this area, it's because these are more user friendly (copy/paste, gui, etc...) however you still need "bricks" to improve the experience.

Kochise

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE[6]: Comment by Drumhellar
by Alfman on Thu 10th May 2012 07:03 in reply to "RE[5]: Comment by Drumhellar"
Alfman Member since:
2011-01-28

Kochise,

...and I assert that someone with little to no computer experience would have a roughly equal learning curve doing basic tasks like browsing the web, checking email, basic document editing on any of these operating systems. This was the demographic you brought up in your original post to which I was responding.

The "average" computer user already has multiple years of experience, however that experience tends to be windows-centric. I won't deny it is true that someone with a significant windows background will clearly have alot of stuff to relearn on linux, especially when it comes to doing more advanced things. Just don't overlook my point that the opposite would be true too. Anyway it's not my intention to get into a pointless debate about one being better for everyone.

I just wanted to correct the impression that linux is harder for beginners to use than windows, it is not. The reason I don't recommend linux for everyone has nothing to do with it being difficult, but rather because it can be an alienating experience in a windows dominated world. You need to be more self driven than a typical windows user. Most of us already have to use windows for our jobs. Linux users will need to find alternatives to the software that friends & co-workers use. Most vendors don't support linux at all, so allot of software and games are going to be unavailable. In short: if you are a sheep, then linux is not for you. If you are an adventurer and don't mind making your own path, then linux has a lot to offer.

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE[7]: Comment by Drumhellar
by Kochise on Thu 10th May 2012 07:37 in reply to "RE[6]: Comment by Drumhellar"
Kochise Member since:
2006-03-03

And my first point was not Linux (vs. the rest of the world) since it was lego-style OS that cannot even provide a coherent user experience without being added with loads of plugin and replacement parts, when you pay a severe amount of money just to get a fancy task manager and file explorer (to make the picture simple)

Kochise

Reply Parent Score: 2