Linked by Thom Holwerda on Sun 3rd Jun 2012 22:04 UTC
Windows So, I've been using the Windows 8 Release Preview since it came out, almost exclusively (except for work, since I'm obviously not going to rely on unfinished and untested software for that). I already knew I could get into Metro on my 11.6" ZenBook, but on my 24" desktop, things aren't looking as rosy. Here's an illustrated guide of the most pressing issues I run into, and five suggestions to address them. Instead of just complaining, let's get constructive.
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RE[4]: Comment by gmlongo
by Yanni Depp on Sun 3rd Jun 2012 22:40 UTC in reply to "RE[3]: Comment by gmlongo"
Yanni Depp
Member since:
2010-02-17

Thom's right here. I have a tri-monitor setup: a 27" iMac with two 20" monitors attached. You wouldn't want a site to fill screens that size: they become difficult to read. For maximum readability, lines of text should have a certain length and have certain spacing. Text running all the way across a 27" monitor wouldn't work.*

As a result, I never have windows maximised. I tile them so I can see multiple things at once. This approach is useful for developers, designers and content creators. We're going to have problems with Metro's window management. Well, most will: I won't since I use OS X. Having two sites in an 80/20 split makes little sense for tiling web pages. Having two apps (web browser and text editor, or two web browsers) in a 50/50 split makes a lot of sense.

* of course, you can have multiple columns or blocks taking up the full 1920x1080 (or higher), dynamically moved and positioned using responsive layouts, but that brings its own set of challenges.

Edited 2012-06-03 22:44 UTC

Reply Parent Score: 7

RE[5]: Comment by gmlongo
by gmlongo on Sun 3rd Jun 2012 22:52 in reply to "RE[4]: Comment by gmlongo"
gmlongo Member since:
2005-07-07

Websites are not fixed width solely because wide screens detract from readability, but because they need to reach as wide an audience as possible; therefore, they need to be readable on as many screens and resolutions as possible.

In any case, this has nothing to do with Metro...which was my original point. Put almost any other app (besides a browser) in the left pane, and the content will be used to its fullest.

And yes, as a software engineer, I understand the need for multiple windows and customization options. But in Windows 8, the desktop still exists, so....

Reply Parent Score: 1

RE[6]: Comment by gmlongo
by redshift on Sun 3rd Jun 2012 23:07 in reply to "RE[5]: Comment by gmlongo"
redshift Member since:
2006-05-06

But in Windows 8, the desktop still exists, so....


Yes, but it is depreciated. Unnecessary hoops to use it today and gone tomorrow if MS has it's way..

Edited 2012-06-03 23:08 UTC

Reply Parent Score: 1

RE[6]: Comment by gmlongo
by Aankhen on Mon 4th Jun 2012 08:57 in reply to "RE[5]: Comment by gmlongo"
Aankhen Member since:
2010-01-13

Websites are not fixed width solely because wide screens detract from readability, but because they need to reach as wide an audience as possible; therefore, they need to be readable on as many screens and resolutions as possible.

Fixed‐width layouts are part of the problem, not the solution. Reading a page that uses a single 800px column on a 22″ screen is a pain: I don’t want to squint and I don’t want to put my face right against the monitor, so I bump up the text size… and get to read three words in a line. Reading a page with a fixed width of 1,280px on a 4.3″ screen with a horizontal resolution of 960px is equally annoying, for obvious reasons.

There is no one size fits all solution. Different devices need different layouts, and you can achieve a lot of that on the web using media queries (see http://css-tricks.com/css-media-queries/ for more on that subject) in combination with relative measures and minimum/maximum widths (for example, size your content using ems and set a max-width of 43em on paragraphs).

Reply Parent Score: 1

RE[5]: Comment by gmlongo
by Morgan on Sun 3rd Jun 2012 22:56 in reply to "RE[4]: Comment by gmlongo"
Morgan Member since:
2005-06-29

Having two sites in an 80/20 split makes little sense for tiling web pages. Having two apps (web browser and text editor, or two web browsers) in a 50/50 split makes a lot of sense.


I agree wholeheartedly, and I feel that Aero Snap was one of the best additions to Windows since the shift to NTFS. A simple flick to the left with one window and flick to the right with another gives you a perfect 50/50 split. For those of us with 16:9 monitors, it means two complete web pages can be seen side by side. For web developers doing a compatibility check visually between browser versions, this is ideal. I've used it myself at the part time job with Notepad++ full of HTML or CSS on the left, and the web browser on the right. Make a change on the left, hit Ctrl+S, hit F5 on the right and there's no need for cumbersome app switching. It's a workflow-centric wet dream.

I'm also happy to see that some *nix desktop environments have begun to copy Aero Snap and other similar features. Why Microsoft wanted to take a huge leap backwards with fullscreen-only browsing in Metro is beyond comprehension.

Reply Parent Score: 5

RE[6]: Comment by gmlongo
by redshift on Sun 3rd Jun 2012 23:03 in reply to "RE[5]: Comment by gmlongo"
redshift Member since:
2006-05-06


I'm also happy to see that some *nix desktop environments have begun to copy Aero Snap and other similar features. Why Microsoft wanted to take a huge leap backwards with fullscreen-only browsing in Metro is beyond comprehension.



I know.... IE has had some kind of full screen kiosk mode since at least win98. I found it to be useless and never used it.

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE[6]: Comment by gmlongo
by xeoron on Mon 4th Jun 2012 01:10 in reply to "RE[5]: Comment by gmlongo"
xeoron Member since:
2007-03-25

Aero Snap still works on the desktop side. They just make multi-pane viewing side-by-side impossible for users in Metro, but maybe some one will make a Metro app that lets you see 1+x panes at a time.

Reply Parent Score: 1

RE[5]: Comment by gmlongo
by MacTO on Mon 4th Jun 2012 01:25 in reply to "RE[4]: Comment by gmlongo"
MacTO Member since:
2006-09-21

of course, you can have multiple columns or blocks taking up the full 1920x1080 (or higher), dynamically moved and positioned using responsive layouts, but that brings its own set of challenges.


Even multiple columns isn't a good solution. It works in print because it is paginated and you can easily view the whole column. (Even newspapers tend to limit the length of columns.) Multiple columns on a web page would force the reader to scroll down then up then down again.

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE[6]: Comment by gmlongo
by zima on Mon 4th Jun 2012 02:40 in reply to "RE[5]: Comment by gmlongo"
zima Member since:
2005-07-06

Unless we'd replace scrolling with flipping...

We already have "readability" functions or extensions in browsers; and one of the ideas behind HTML was that the client has some control over presentation - it might as well make columns.

That could even fit new UI models (tablets, and so on ...including Metro)

Edited 2012-06-04 02:41 UTC

Reply Parent Score: 2