Linked by Thom Holwerda on Thu 7th Jun 2012 21:23 UTC
Legal So, the next venue of patent trolling has just been opened. Apple has patented - quite specifically - the wedge shape of the MacBook Air. Not the general design or impression, no - just the wedge shape. This is interesting, because that wedge shape? Hit prior art in 3.2 seconds: the Vaio x505 from 2004. A wedge-shaped, superthin (for its day) laptop - exactly what Apple's design patent claims the company has invented.
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USA uncompetitive
by project_2501 on Thu 7th Jun 2012 22:25 UTC
project_2501
Member since:
2006-03-20

The original point of patent protection was to incentivise innovation. To ultimately make the USA an attractive place for business and economic growth.

What we have now is the patent system abused - allowed to be abused by an incompetent patent office - which is stifling innovation and making the USA increasingly unattractive for businesses.

If this continues at the crazy pace this is - the USA will become unattractive, prhibitive for business. At that point the USA will initiate change but probably not before. It'll be the point when US citizen look beyond their borders and see more innovation, choice and economic activity in other countries which have a more sensible approach to patents. They'll look at their own and and realise that an economy of a few super-patent-laden monopolies is not giving them what they thought they deserved as US citizens.

Reply Score: 9

RE: USA uncompetitive
by zima on Thu 14th Jun 2012 23:56 in reply to "USA uncompetitive"
zima Member since:
2005-07-06

What we have now is the patent system abused - allowed to be abused by an incompetent patent office

Maybe not incompetent... they were directed - a little less than a decade ago by the then-current US administration, IIRC - to make a profit as an institution (instead of, as is sane for public institutions, to make a "loss" by itself but to bring societal benefits which more than outweigh institutional costs). So of course they'll going to grant tons of frivolous patents, that's the only way for them to be profitable.

It'll be the point when US citizen look beyond their borders and see more innovation, choice and economic activity in other countries which have a more sensible approach to patents. They'll look at their own and and realise that an economy of a few super-patent-laden monopolies is not giving them what they thought they deserved as US citizens.

Don't count on it too much. It's a place already with tons of myths about their "exceptionalism" which don't quite measure up to reality, the "land of opportunity" with its "American dream" ...while, in actual measure of this stuff (social mobility), the US is at the bottom of developed countries (some of the countries popularly derided in the US, so called "nanny states", are at the top BTW).

A place of http://web.mit.edu/krugman/www/ratrace.html myths - seems they sort of value "few super-patent-laden monopolies" ...which give conditions where people can dream that they will be one of the few who end up on top.

Reply Parent Score: 2