Linked by Thom Holwerda on Wed 20th Jun 2012 00:40 UTC, submitted by rohan_p
Amiga & AROS "Icaros Desktop is an effort to build a modern Amiga-compatible operating system for standard x86 hardware. It's a distribution built atop AROS, which is an open source effort to create a system compatible at the API level with the AmigaOS 3.x series. I recently had a chat to the creator of Icaros, Paolo Besser, about the creation of the OS and why Amiga continues to inspire people today."
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RE[5]: Hmmm
by MOS6510 on Wed 20th Jun 2012 10:25 UTC in reply to "RE[4]: Hmmm"
MOS6510
Member since:
2011-05-12

Amiga's being used for games is probably a fact, but an extra floppy drive is an logical assumption. Try using an Amiga without an extra drive, you spend more time swapping disks than using it. Perhaps these extra drives easily got lost when people moved their Amiga's in to the attic for storage. I must admit I'm not sure where my extra drives are.

The most popular joystick was the Arcade, which I never had fail on me, unlike others. Buy I also have these crappy Atari 2600 joysticks and they keep working too. I guess I have a gentle touch.

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE[6]: Hmmm
by zima on Wed 20th Jun 2012 10:43 in reply to "RE[5]: Hmmm"
zima Member since:
2005-07-06

an extra floppy drive is an logical assumption

Not really. Each Amiga had a floppy drive already built in, which worked perfectly fine. And most of their users were very price-concious, often kids.
Similar ~social dynamics of Amigans can be seen with quite poor uptake of A1200 or "big" Amigas - yes, they were better, but to most not worth it, not when vast libraries of software worked fine with "plain" models; very limited funds could go elsewhere.

Sure, an extra drive afforded some convenience now and then - but games, if multi-floppy, were mostly structured to be "linearly" sectioned onto disks (plus you yourself pointed out recently that RPGs had small uptake).

Try using an Amiga without an extra drive, you spend more time swapping disks than using it

That is an unfounded hyperbole. I did use an Amiga without an extra drive, as did virtually all around (as I said, I've never even seen one). And it was still great (at least large part of games, maybe most, being single-floppy, anyway)

Perhaps these extra drives easily got lost when people moved their Amiga's in to the attic for storage.

And that is a very convenient conjecture, indeed - almost all those floppy drives just lost like that...
But at the least, memory expansions definitely wouldn't share their fate - and they're also virtually absent from auction sites, while you implied their wide, and comparable to disk drives, uptake.

Edited 2012-06-20 10:52 UTC

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE[7]: Hmmm
by MOS6510 on Wed 20th Jun 2012 11:00 in reply to "RE[6]: Hmmm"
MOS6510 Member since:
2011-05-12

"an extra floppy drive is an logical assumption

Not really. Each Amiga had a floppy drive already built in, which worked perfectly fine. And most of their users were very price-concious, often kids.
"

I was a poor kid and I had an extra drive. It really was worth the money.


Similar ~social dynamics of Amigans can be seen with quite poor uptake of A1200 or "big" Amigas - yes, they was better, but to most not worth it, not when very limited funds could go elsewhere.

Sure, an extra drive afforded some convenience now and then - but games, if multi-floppy, were mostly structured to be "linearly" sectioned onto disks (plus you yourself pointed out recently that RPGs had small uptake).


Not only RPGs came on multiple disks, others did too. And as I mentioned gamers also used their Amiga for serious stuff, if only for copying game disks or making a database of their games collection.


"Try using an Amiga without an extra drive, you spend more time swapping disks than using it


That is an unfounded hyperbole. I did use an Amiga without an extra drive, as did virtually all around (as I said, I've never even seen one). And it was still great (at least large part of games, maybe most, being single-floppy, anyway)
"

I'm sure if you did have an extra drive and it broke down you'd be very sad. Okay, if you only played single disk games you wouldn't need an extra drive.


"Perhaps these extra drives easily got lost when people moved their Amiga's in to the attic for storage.

And that is a very convenient conjecture, indeed - almost all those floppy drives just lost like that...
But at the least, memory expansions definitely wouldn't share their fate - and they're also virtually absent from auction sites, while you implied their wide, and comparable to disk drives, uptake.
"

Well, that's easy: they are build in. IIRC only the Amiga 500 "needed" this expansion, later Amiga's had more memory and a build in battery powered clock. As they were installed over 20 years ago most people probably don't even know they have them.

I can find my Amiga's, but I don't know where my extras are like the external drives, mice, hard disk, faster CPU add-on, sound sampler and a "hacking" cartridge.

Reply Parent Score: 3