Linked by Thom Holwerda on Thu 21st Jun 2012 11:17 UTC
Google While I sometimes see Dutch as an endangered language, reality is that with nearly 30 million speakers worldwide, we're actually doing pretty well. Sadly, this can't be said for the 3000 truly endangered languages of the world - nearly half of the world's total number of languages is on the verge of extinction, and with it, large amounts of human culture are in danger of disappearing forever. In collaboration with several universities and language institutions, Google has launched the Endangered Languages Project to document these languages - textually, visually, and auditorially.
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RE: Sounds Good
by M.Onty on Thu 21st Jun 2012 16:37 UTC in reply to "Sounds Good"
M.Onty
Member since:
2009-10-23

Its a long shot but these things can come back from the grave. Look at Cornish or Hebrew.

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE[2]: Sounds Good
by dylansmrjones on Fri 22nd Jun 2012 07:52 in reply to "RE: Sounds Good"
dylansmrjones Member since:
2005-10-02

Or Manx (though Manx could use a proper Gaelic orthography).

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE[2]: Sounds Good
by henderson101 on Fri 22nd Jun 2012 12:09 in reply to "RE: Sounds Good"
henderson101 Member since:
2006-05-30

Hebrew yes. Cornish is more problematic. There are a number of competing versions. The only one I ever liked is the least popular, the "Modern" version by Richard Gendall. It's most like modern Welsh and Breton to me. The others are nice, but retain archaic and quirky features and spellings.

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE[3]: Sounds Good
by dylansmrjones on Fri 22nd Jun 2012 18:32 in reply to "RE[2]: Sounds Good"
dylansmrjones Member since:
2005-10-02

I dislike the "modern" (RLC) version. The orthography is not particularly Celtic, it is basically Anglo-Cornish with English spelling, and differs greatly from Welsh and Breton. I prefer a certain level of linguistic purity for the sake of diversity (and to undo the effect of English imperialism), so Modern Cornish is a no-go.
The same is true for the Peurunvan and Skolveurieg orthographies (the latter being too french) for Breton. The right one to use is obviously Etrerannyezhel, with its dependency on proper Brythonic etymology. I also prefer formal Welsh over informal Welsh, the former being closer to Cornish and Breton.

Reply Parent Score: 2