Linked by Thom Holwerda on Thu 21st Jun 2012 11:17 UTC
Google While I sometimes see Dutch as an endangered language, reality is that with nearly 30 million speakers worldwide, we're actually doing pretty well. Sadly, this can't be said for the 3000 truly endangered languages of the world - nearly half of the world's total number of languages is on the verge of extinction, and with it, large amounts of human culture are in danger of disappearing forever. In collaboration with several universities and language institutions, Google has launched the Endangered Languages Project to document these languages - textually, visually, and auditorially.
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RE[8]: Sounds Good
by henderson101 on Sat 23rd Jun 2012 10:17 UTC in reply to "RE[7]: Sounds Good"
henderson101
Member since:
2006-05-30

There really is only Breton and Welsh though, and whilst they are similar, they are also completely different. The mutation system doesn't agree at all, nor does the Cornish one for that matter. Any Cornish that exists is synthetic. The modern dialect with a more Welsh orthography would be nice. let's be honest, Breton is closer to what Cornish should be like (as a spoken language) than Welsh, due to the Breton's being people's of a closer original geographical location (the Breton language originated from people's fleeing the UK, mostly southern people's). The Welsh were isolates.

Manx is another kettle of fish. It had an established written form, so the form you have is what it should use really.

Edited 2012-06-23 10:19 UTC

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE[9]: Sounds Good
by dylansmrjones on Sat 23rd Jun 2012 11:51 in reply to "RE[8]: Sounds Good"
dylansmrjones Member since:
2005-10-02

They cannot be completely different and similar at the same time. They are mostly similar with a few differences here and there, but they are almost non-existant if you compare Formal Welsh with the interdialectale orthography (Etrerannyezhel). Cornish is very much a living language though with very few speakers. Calling it synthetic (e.g. artificial) is pretty much offensive, considering the circumstances. It is very much alive and SWF is based primarily on Late Middle Cornish making it no more artificial than modern Danish or Icelandic.

Manx Gaelic should really be written with a proper Gaelic orthography, getting rid of the nasty English-inspired orthography. Just because a silly englishman happened to write Manx with english orthography, doesn't mean that should be the future written form ;)

Compare this written in anglo-Manx Gaelic:
Ta'n Gaelg feer ghoan çheumooie jeh Ellan Vannin, agh fod pobble ennagh screeu ee ayns çheeryn elley.
with the same using a proper Manx Gaelic orthography:
Tà'n Ghaelg fìor-ghónn teabh a-muigh de Eilean Mhannain, ach faod pobal eanach scrìobh ì ans tìoran eile.
and compare with Irish Gaelic:
Tá an Ghaeilge an-ghann (fíor-ghann) taobh amuigh de Oileán Mhannanáin, ach féadann daoine [pobal] éigin(each) í a scríobh i dtíortha eile.
and Scottish Gaelic:
Tha a' Ghàidhlig glé ghann (fìor-ghann) taobh a-muigh de Eilean Mhannain, ach faodaidh daoine [pobal] igint(each) ì a sgrìobhadh ann an tìrean eile.

It is obvious why Manx Gaelic should be written with a proper Gaelic orthography. Again: It is all about purity ;)

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE[10]: Sounds Good
by henderson101 on Sat 23rd Jun 2012 12:50 in reply to "RE[9]: Sounds Good"
henderson101 Member since:
2006-05-30

Formal Welsh is not a living spoken language any more. Not really. The colloquial Welsh is.

Cornish doesn't exist. All you have is a reconstruction based on the best guess of a bunch of non native speakers. Calling it anything else is fantasy. Also, you'd be lucky to find anyone in Cornwall with any knowledge. Believe me, I've worked in Wales and worked with real native speakers. I've been to Scotland and met a couple of native Gaelic speakers. I've had enough Irish friends to know that most 30 something's (and younger) have basic Irish drummed in to them at school. I've been to Cornwall numerous times, including spending time on the Lizard and round Helston, heart of the last refuge of Cornish. Never met one person that could say anything more that a few sentences. There are probably more fluent Klingon speakers than Cornish speakers.

As for Manx - who says the others have it right? Neither of the current spellings systems (agreed spelling conventions) are more than 100 years old now. Both have had major reforms in the 1950's and later. If you want to be authentic, use the traditional Irish script. Any where a Ch, Gh, Dh, etc is used are neologisms. If anything, Manx orthography captures the actual spelling of a word more exactly.

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE[10]: Sounds Good
by henderson101 on Sat 23rd Jun 2012 13:13 in reply to "RE[9]: Sounds Good"
henderson101 Member since:
2006-05-30

They cannot be completely different and similar at the same time. They are mostly similar with a few differences here and there, but they are almost non-existant if you compare Formal Welsh with the interdialectale orthography (Etrerannyezhel).


They can. All three have comonality, but all three diverge. None agree on specific grammar, not in spoken form.

Cornish is very much a living language though with very few speakers. Calling it synthetic (e.g. artificial) is pretty much offensive, considering the circumstances. It is very much alive and SWF is based primarily on Late Middle Cornish making it no more artificial than modern Danish or Icelandic.


No, that's just a fantasy. There were no native speakers left. The last native speakers died in the 19th Century (earlier if you believe the Dolly Pentreath story) and anything spoken today is entirely synthetic and constructed from the scant documents they had to hand in the 1920s (for the Jenner branch), then Kemmyn is a refinement of that premise (slightly more authentic, still synthetic) and Late/Modern is a construction of Gendall in the late 70's and early 80's. Gosh, I even remember them announcing hs work on TV news back in the 80's. Comparing this to Icelandic (which has been spoken continuously) and Danish/Swedish (also continuous) is an utter joke. You may like the romantic fantasy that Cornish is a real revival of the language, but it's a conlang based on the remnants of real Cornish. No one knows if the people who spoke Cornish in the medieval times even still used the written grammar. Look at Welsh. Formal welsh hasn't been a living spoken language for hundreds of years.

It is all about purity ;)


Forget Cornish then.

Reply Parent Score: 2