Linked by Thom Holwerda on Fri 29th Jun 2012 22:17 UTC
Legal I stopped following all the patent trolling in the mobile industry months ago because, you know, I have a life, but apparently some big ruling just got handed down in the United States: using three software patents, a patent troll from Cupertino has been given an injunction on Samsung's Galaxy Nexus, imposing a ban on the device. This patent trolling has to stop, blah, blah, we've all been here before. If you need me, I'll be over there on the sofa remembering the good old days when Cupertino was famous for great products, instead of infamous for its patent troll.
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Nelson
Member since:
2005-11-29

Um, the Nexus is at end of life - we bought one a couple of months ago for $200 off. I thing Samsung has pretty much ridden that horse to market and back, but your concern for Samsung's healthy profit margins is commendable.


Yes, however there's the legal costs they were wrapped up in. In multiple countries. All over the world.

Plus, please tell me you don't think that this is exclusively applicable to the Galaxy Nexus? The only reason the Nexus is specifically mentioned is because it is all that existed when this suit was filed.

They can easily extend it to other devices, as Apple has done in other places around the world.


I wish in creating my old Treo Palm had thought of a rectangular shape, with rows of icons to launch apps, a settings page for configuring the device, and a web browser. How innovative Apple was in creating my iPad - they stood not on the shoulders of giants, but the base of the Grand Canyon! /sarcasm


On the very front page of this website there's an article which praises Apple for their contribution to the smartphone market. Apple undoubtedly innovated in this area, and I think its pigheaded to simply brush aside those innovations.

They did most of the legwork for Android user interaction today, and as such, they deserve some credit.

Reply Parent Score: 1

some1 Member since:
2010-10-05

They did most of the legwork for Android user interaction today, and as such, they deserve some credit.

Well, no, they did not. Apple did not invent the touch interface, they did something else. They created a market for smartphones. They made a simple polished device, targeted at an average guy/gal, not at power users like the smartphones before them. Then they did a massive marketing push (including staged queues at mobile shops) to convince an average user that he/she *needs* a smartphone. Now they are understandably pissed that other companies also benefit from their multi-billion investment, but I don't think there's a legal protection for hype.

Reply Parent Score: 3

Nelson Member since:
2005-11-29


Well, no, they did not. Apple did not invent the touch interface, they did something else. They created a market for smartphones. They made a simple polished device, targeted at an average guy/gal, not at power users like the smartphones before them. Then they did a massive marketing push (including staged queues at mobile shops) to convince an average user that he/she *needs* a smartphone. Now they are understandably pissed that other companies also benefit from their multi-billion investment, but I don't think there's a legal protection for hype.


But they did pioneer, implement, and patent the interaction between the user and his screen. The gestures, the paradigms, are all obviously Apple. I'm not an Apple defender by any stretch of imagination, but its only right that they be recognized here.

I just don't find it right that Android can do a wholesale copy of iOS and then get upset when they're in the legal hot seat.

Reply Parent Score: -1

grahamtriggs Member since:
2009-05-27

On the very front page of this website there's an article which praises Apple for their contribution to the smartphone market. Apple undoubtedly innovated in this area, and I think its pigheaded to simply brush aside those innovations.


Innovation? Really? No doubt that Apple have changed the smartphone market dramatically. But being the first to demonstrate that something can be viable and desirable, is not the same as innovating.

Take a look at this:
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Smartphone#Early_years

The only real difference between IBM's Simon (1992), and the iPhone is the 15 years of technology and manufacturing advances that made it possible, and Google technology. Conceptually, they are the same device - multifunction, touchscreen only.

And even if you want to talk about multi-touch gestures, Apple certainly didn't invent them. Apple *bought* the company that did most of the work in the early 2000s, only 2 years before launching the iPhone.

Although Pierre Wellner published a paper covering the same ground - in 1991.

No doubt Apple have pushed the boundaries of what is physically achievable at (high end) consumer prices, and built a formidable business. And they make some very good products. But they are nowhere near as innovative as they have successfully fooled people into believing.

Reply Parent Score: 11

Nelson Member since:
2005-11-29

You can be innovative in how you execute, bringing something to mass market, making it consumable, and usable. That's something to be lauded.

Sure there have been touch screens, and gestures, and whatever else, but there are very specific nuances in Apple's applications of these concepts if you look beyond the abstracts of the patents they hold. There is some real thoughtfulness.

To me, being able to bring all this together into a cohesive product at the time was unspeakable. Apple shook the mobile world hard, and altered the roadmap of every mobile company in the industry.

Reply Parent Score: 2

akrosdbay Member since:
2008-06-09

"On the very front page of this website there's an article which praises Apple for their contribution to the smartphone market. Apple undoubtedly innovated in this area, and I think its pigheaded to simply brush aside those innovations.


Innovation? Really? No doubt that Apple have changed the smartphone market dramatically. But being the first to demonstrate that something can be viable and desirable, is not the same as innovating.
"

Bullshit. That is the definition of innovation.

n·no·vate   [in-uh-veyt] Show IPA verb, in·no·vat·ed, in·no·vat·ing.
verb (used without object)
1.
to introduce something new; make changes in anything established.


The anti-apple pro android shills are out is full force with no understanding of what things are.. OSnews jumped the shark ever since Thom took over. It's become the gossip rag of the technology world.

Reply Parent Score: 1

phoudoin Member since:
2006-06-09

(Apple) did most of the legwork for Android user interaction today, and as such, they deserve some credit.


Does 150 billions iPhone sales not enough credit?
Or only an all-credits-monopole?

Because, they can't claim *all* merits. Prior arts forbid that. And it's hard to buy past history.

Reply Parent Score: 2

Nelson Member since:
2005-11-29

What prior art? Stop saying that. Present legally valid prior art, and I suggest you fax your information over to Samsung's lawyers. I'm sure they'd appreciate it.

Reply Parent Score: 2