Linked by Thom Holwerda on Wed 25th Jul 2012 22:18 UTC
OSNews, Generic OSes The article I'm about to link to, by Oliver Reichenstein, is pretty terrible, but it's a good way for me to bring up something I've been meaning to talk about. First, the article: "Apple has been working on its file system and with iOS it had almost killed the concept of folders - before reintroducing them with a peculiar restriction: only one level! With Mountain Lion it brings its one folder level logic to OSX. What could be the reason for such a restrictive measure?" So, where does this crusade against directory structures (not file systems, as the article aggravatingly keeps stating) come from?
Thread beginning with comment 528209
To read all comments associated with this story, please click here.
Oliver has lost it.
by howitzer86 on Thu 26th Jul 2012 00:10 UTC
howitzer86
Member since:
2008-02-27

It's simple. People aren't smart enough to use computers. They can't start their own projects with their own meaningful file structure. If you paint a texture for a game project, you'll just have to live with it being right next to the wedding photos. Like web design? Too bad, your index.html is just going to have to sit next to all your other html files, including other index pages. You're not smart enough to program anyway, go back to watching Pit Boss you dummy.

You're just not smart enough to use a computer, let alone use it to do actual work.

At least, that's what this nut-case thinks. I doubt Apple would ever go so far as to remove your access to your own files. Too many art "geeks" depend on them. I mean think about it, when you develop software, a website, or even a movie, you know you Oliver is simply off his rocker. Apple depends on those "Geeks" he speaks so poorly about to produce content for Apple to publish, websites for Macs to read, and programs that run on their computers and i-devices. That's why they can't even take your console away, because they know their developers still need it.

There's only so much iOS-ification you can do to a computer before it becomes too much of a hassle to develop for, so you can count on this just being a fantasy.

Reply Score: 7

RE: Oliver has lost it.
by phoenix on Thu 26th Jul 2012 02:04 in reply to "Oliver has lost it."
phoenix Member since:
2005-07-11

I deal with a lot of Windows users in my day job.

People understand directory hierarchies. But Windows makes 'Desktop' the root of a pseudo-filesystem, and 'My Documents' the root of another pseudo-filesystem, both of which are only accessible from icons in Windows Explorer.

When people have to deal with the actual filesystem on the disk, they get confused, because C: is the real root of the filesystem, and 'Desktop' and 'My Documents' are buried several levels deep.

I'm a firm believer that all the 'help' MS provides to users is actually hindering more then helping.

If you provide users access to the filesystem, they'll figure things out. Hide things behind layers upon layer of abstractions to 'simplify' things, and you'll just confuse them.

Reply Parent Score: 8

RE[2]: Oliver has lost it.
by tupp on Thu 26th Jul 2012 03:43 in reply to "RE: Oliver has lost it."
tupp Member since:
2006-11-12

If you provide users access to the filesystem, they'll figure things out. Hide things behind layers upon layer of abstractions to 'simplify' things, and you'll just confuse them.

Agreed, 1000%!

Reply Parent Score: 3

RE[2]: Oliver has lost it.
by UltraZelda64 on Thu 26th Jul 2012 07:25 in reply to "RE: Oliver has lost it."
UltraZelda64 Member since:
2006-12-05

When people have to deal with the actual filesystem on the disk, they get confused, because C: is the real root of the filesystem, and 'Desktop' and 'My Documents' are buried several levels deep.

The fact that they're "buried" is not so bad. Hell, look at Linux and its typical directories:

/: Root file system
/home/user: User's home directory
/home/user/Document's: User's documents
/home/user/Music: User's music
/home/user/Pictures: User's pictures
/home/user/Videos: User's videos
...etc...

They're "buried" (not in the top level directory), but it's relatively simplified and makes perfect sense to me... completely logical and easy to remember. Windows Vista, as shitty as it was, did make some improvements here though, I have to admit ("C:\Users\User Name" instead of "C:\Documents and Settings\User Name"

But you're wrong about C: being the "real" root of the file system. It's only the root of what is most commonly the system drive in Windows and DOS before it, which is usually set up to be a whole disk but can sometimes be a smaller partition. Every hard drive partition, CD/DVD-ROM disc and USB drive has its own root file system. In UNIX/Linux, there is one virtual filesystem under which *everything* resides.

Reply Parent Score: 4

RE: Oliver has lost it.
by muda on Thu 26th Jul 2012 13:21 in reply to "Oliver has lost it."
muda Member since:
2008-12-23

Apple depends on those "Geeks" he speaks so poorly about to produce content for Apple to publish, websites for Macs to read, and programs that run on their computers and i-devices. That's why they can't even take your console away, because they know their developers still need it.


I beg to differ. Given how much revenue OSX generates compared to iOS one might very well say that it wouldn't hurt Apple much to ditch entire platform apart from the fact that OSX is the development platform for iOS. The latter could be remedied by porting XCode to Windows.

I don't think there is any intrinsic need for Apple to continue supporting UNIX desktop (or server). Of course, for the time being the OSX is development platform and testbed for technologies but we've also seen that Apple provides special hardware for developers and noone else. In the end of the day we could only have idevices and development system for the subscribed developers and Apple's revenues largely maintained at the same level (but profit margin could be even higher since they wouln't need to support millions of end users).

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE[2]: Oliver has lost it.
by howitzer86 on Sun 29th Jul 2012 04:25 in reply to "RE: Oliver has lost it."
howitzer86 Member since:
2008-02-27

They would lose ownership of the "whole widget" if they gave development away to Windows users, and especially if they gave up their PC platform.

Sure, they could survive financially, maybe even for years after the bad press died down... but Apple would be a body without a head if they did that. The magic behind the Apple experience that so many users enjoy would not survive.

However as a Windows user, I would welcome that development. Microsoft is pretty good about making sure Windows stays a decent development platform. They might even help Apple cut off its own head by working with them to build those compiling options and Apple libraries directly into Visual Studio. Then Apple wouldn't have to worry about Xcode either. They could just be a dumb phone and gadget manufacturer like everybody else. It would be sad, but I'd get over it pretty quick. ;)

Edited 2012-07-29 04:27 UTC

Reply Parent Score: 1