Linked by Thom Holwerda on Tue 16th Oct 2012 12:14 UTC
Windows After yesterday's TV advertisement, Microsoft finally unveiled the pricing for its Surface tablet - the ARM Windows RT version that is. The cheapest Surface - 32GB without touch cover - will set you back $499. They're aiming straight for iPad pricing here, ignoring the popular cheaper Android offerings. Update: only available in Australia, Canada, China, France, Germany, Hong Kong, the United Kingdom and the United States. As usual.
Thread beginning with comment 538681
To view parent comment, click here.
To read all comments associated with this story, please click here.
RE: Tipping point
by moondevil on Tue 16th Oct 2012 15:03 UTC in reply to "Tipping point"
moondevil
Member since:
2005-07-08

Hopefully back to a 80's like scenario where there was plenty of manufactures and operating systems to choose from.

Reply Parent Score: 3

RE[2]: Tipping point
by lucas_maximus on Tue 16th Oct 2012 20:14 in reply to "RE: Tipping point"
lucas_maximus Member since:
2009-08-18

It was sooo great how nothing would work with one another </sarcasm>

Reply Parent Score: 4

RE[3]: Tipping point
by moondevil on Tue 16th Oct 2012 21:31 in reply to "RE[2]: Tipping point"
moondevil Member since:
2005-07-08

Everything worked fine with standard document formats.

I never had problems exchanging data between Amiga and PC for all my music, image and documents.

With heterogeneous computing everyone needs to respect standards for data interchange, otherwise they dye.

Office only became the monster it is today, thanks to the hegemony of the Microsoft based systems in the PC world.

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE[2]: Tipping point
by mattymoo on Wed 17th Oct 2012 00:37 in reply to "RE: Tipping point"
mattymoo Member since:
2011-12-29

I hope so too! I diverse ecosystem of operating systems is good for everyone.

Reply Parent Score: 0

RE[2]: Tipping point
by zima on Tue 23rd Oct 2012 23:44 in reply to "RE: Tipping point"
zima Member since:
2005-07-06

Hopefully back to a 80's like scenario where there was plenty of manufactures and operating systems to choose from.

And the times of lock-in much greater than today - all the investment in a usable setup, all its hw & software, couldn't be moved to other platforms (typically, not even from the same manufacturer). Additionally, NVM that 80s micros were generally too limited & not the best deal, there was also a big risk of getting simply a total flop of a platform.

Other than that, there were essentially only 3 platforms that mattered ...maybe 5; not much different than now. The rest were rubbish - even most of the 5 were, considering their prolonged death (Commodore for example was still pumping out C64's in 92 or 93, and flooding less fortunate markets with them)

Luckily the PC, with its powerful hw and sw brought by its economies of scale, liberated us from those.

Reply Parent Score: 2