Linked by Thom Holwerda on Thu 25th Oct 2012 20:50 UTC
Windows "Microsoft today announced the global availability of its popular Windows operating system, Windows 8. Beginning Friday, Oct. 26, consumers and businesses worldwide will be able to experience all that Windows 8 has to offer, including a beautiful new user interface and a wide range of applications with the grand opening of the Windows Store." I'm still not clear on what '12:01 AM local time' means, but if it means it goes on sale in every country on 12:01 AM, I'll be buying in a bit over an hour!
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Dave_K
Member since:
2005-11-16

Or it could mean that you'd rather use an OS that runs faster, boots faster, and is more memory efficient than Windows 7. Not to mention sporting some other features like native USB 3 support, a much improve task manager, hyper-V virtualization, native mounting of ISO files, taskbars on multiple monitors, etc.


All relatively minor improvements that to me are outweighed by the "Modern UI" kludge.

So don't decide you hate it until you spend some time getting acclimated with it.


I've spent quite a bit of time with it.

I don't care about the Start Screen. I don't think its much of an improvement over the old Start Menu, but I can easily live with it.

It's the thought of having to use Modern UI apps alongside my desktop software that I have a problem with. No amount of acclimatisation is going to convince me that full screen mobile apps work well on my 30" 2560x1600 monitor.

And don't worry about the 'classic' desktop being gone in Windows 9. MS needs to do a lot of work before Metro even becomes a viable replacement so they can port 'real' apps to it like Visual Studio. We're at LEAST 10 years away from that happening.


I don't think that the desktop will be removed completely in the next version of Windows. Just like support for DOS and Windows 3.1 software, I'm sure it'll hang around for quite a while in later versions of Windows.

That doesn't mean that all the software I use will continue to be produced for the desktop. Something like Visual Studio may not be switching any time soon, but what about web browsers, media players, file viewers, utilities, and other relatively simple apps?

Writing for modern UI, developers can create one app that runs on both RT tablets and Windows 8 desktops. I can see that appealing to developers if Windows 8 and its app store are a success. Once apps and utilities that I need start moving to Modern UI it'll no longer be so optional and easily avoidable.

In my opinion, the longer Windows 7 stays a popular OS, the longer it'll be before I have to suffer Modern UI apps. Maybe by then Linux will have turned into an OS I can happily use (although I'm not going to hold my breath waiting for that to happen).

Reply Parent Score: 5

WorknMan Member since:
2005-11-13

don't care about the Start Screen. I don't think its much of an improvement over the old Start Menu, but I can easily live with it.

It's the thought of having to use Modern UI apps alongside my desktop software that I have a problem with. No amount of acclimatisation is going to convince me that full screen mobile apps work well on my 30" 2560x1600 monitor.


Well, that was my entire point. The start screen is the only part of Metro you have to interact with in Windows 8 (and not even then if you use a launcher), and even you yourself said the start screen isn't a big deal. There is a lot of nerd rage about the start screen, and I'm not sure why, since it's little more than a reskinned start menu with a couple of new bells and whistles. Just hit the win key and select an app, or start typing if you need to search. It's the same damn thing as before with a different look.

I don't think I'd pay full price to upgrade to Windows 8, but for $40, why not? I hardly ever use the start menu anyway, so Metro is no big deal to me, since I probably own't be dealing with it 99% of the time.

I don't think that the desktop will be removed completely in the next version of Windows. Just like support for DOS and Windows 3.1 software, I'm sure it'll hang around for quite a while in later versions of Windows.

That doesn't mean that all the software I use will continue to be produced for the desktop. Something like Visual Studio may not be switching any time soon, but what about web browsers, media players, file viewers, utilities, and other relatively simple apps?


As I stated in my original post, keep in mind that the current incarnation of Metro is only a 1.0 release. Unless it flops and MS pulls the plug early, it's going to get better. The more features they add to it, the easier it'll be for 'real' apps to run on it, and (hopefully) the easier MS will make it to run Metro and desktop apps at the same time. Remember that Windows 7 is little more than an evolution of Windows 1.0, and I'm sure when Windows 1.0 was released, people largely gave it the middle finger and kept using DOS. It wasn't until Windows 3.x that it really caught on.

By the time the last of the desktop apps are ported over to Metro (like Visual Studio) and the 'classic' desktop goes away, most people probably won't even notice, except for those who want to run legacy apps and games. It'll be like when they pulled the plug on DOS in 2k/XP.

Reply Parent Score: 3

Dave_K Member since:
2005-11-16

Well, that was my entire point. The start screen is the only part of Metro you have to interact with in Windows 8


That's true right now, but it'll stop being true when there are Metro/Modern apps that I need to run. That was my point.

As I stated in my original post, keep in mind that the current incarnation of Metro is only a 1.0 release. Unless it flops and MS pulls the plug early, it's going to get better.


Metro/Modern will always be compromised on the desktop by its need to work well on small, finger operated, touch-screen tablets. In user interface design one size definitely doesn't fit all.

While it may improve in future versions, I see little chance of full desktop functionality being added to this touch/tablet focussed UI. At best I think there'll be an improved version of 'snap', with apps able to be split more flexibly.

I rarely run software full screen. I use multiple windows and the full window management features provided by the traditional desktop. Anything less than that is a major downgrade.

By the time the last of the desktop apps are ported over to Metro (like Visual Studio) and the 'classic' desktop goes away, most people probably won't even notice, except for those who want to run legacy apps and games. It'll be like when they pulled the plug on DOS in 2k/XP.


I think those of us who don't want a restrictive tablet interface running on our large screen desktop PCs will notice too.

Reply Parent Score: 2