Linked by Thom Holwerda on Sat 10th Nov 2012 01:41 UTC
Windows "Despite the fact that I've been using Windows 8 for the past three weeks, I somehow managed to overlook a rather stark feature in the OS: ads. No, we're not talking about ads cluttering up the desktop or login screen (thankfully), but rather ads that can be found inside of some Modern UI apps that Windows ships with. That includes Finance, Weather, Travel, News and so forth. Is it a problem? Let's tackle this from a couple of different angles." Hadn't seen them either - I don't use those applications - but this is pretty despicable.
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RE: Comment by Drumhellar
by UltraZelda64 on Sat 10th Nov 2012 04:48 UTC in reply to "Comment by Drumhellar"
UltraZelda64
Member since:
2006-12-05

Well, the ads are unobtrusive, and the apps they show up in are apps that have new content updated throughout the day, it doesn't bother me at all.

No ads are "unobtrusive" when you don't want to be force-fed these companies' shit, especially after you've paid a ridiculous amount of money for a piece of software.

Windows, that you have to pay hundreds for at retail, is adware. Who would've guessed? I think Lavasoft needs to push out a new version if they're still around that offers to wipe the disk clean if Windows 8 is installed because, after all, it's just a big, glorified, expensive example of what it's fighting.

Literally--for anything good that ever comes to Windows, there are dozens of major, major regressions. Commercial adware... gotta love it.

Reply Parent Score: 9

RE[2]: Comment by Drumhellar
by WorknMan on Sat 10th Nov 2012 05:58 in reply to "RE: Comment by Drumhellar"
WorknMan Member since:
2005-11-13

Windows, that you have to pay hundreds for at retail, is adware.


Hundreds? Nice troll ;)

Reply Parent Score: 3

UltraZelda64 Member since:
2006-12-05

Last I checked, the full retail copy of Windows didn't cost in the tens of dollars. Some low-end upgrades might be $99.99999, but they're still basically a hundred. You're probably alluding to the to $40 special upgrade promotion for Windows 8. If so, you'd better run out and get a copy while the special pricing lasts, because it won't stay there for long. Additionally, you'd better have a copy of Windows already--because the promotion is only for the upgrade copies.

I'm pretty damn sure I had to pay $200 for Windows XP Professional years ago just to get away from the trainwreck that was Windows ME, and if it was the "full" version it would have been a whopping $300. Vista and 7 came with prices of up to $400 if I remember right (one of the many reasons I ditched the OS starting with that release; SKU nightmares and increasingly ridiculous pricing schemes being only two big ones).

And while I don't care too much about Windows 8's pricing myself (Windows 8 is Windows, Windows was always expensive, it's 2012 and that's obvious by now, nothing new...), a quick glance on Amazon shows that Windows 8 Pro will jump right up to $200 soon enough. And yes... again... that's just the upgrade, once again.

Reply Parent Score: 1

RE[3]: Comment by Drumhellar
by jnemesh on Mon 12th Nov 2012 21:03 in reply to "RE[2]: Comment by Drumhellar"
jnemesh Member since:
2008-04-08

I am seeing $199 or so for a FULL RETAIL copy of Windows 8. Yeah, you can get an upgrade for $40, but how much is the copy of Windows 7 to go with it?

Reply Parent Score: 1

RE[3]: Comment by Drumhellar
by gumoz on Mon 12th Nov 2012 22:51 in reply to "RE[2]: Comment by Drumhellar"
gumoz Member since:
2008-05-15

"Windows, that you have to pay hundreds for at retail, is adware.


Hundreds? Nice troll ;)
"
In Mexico you pay more than $200 USD for it.

Reply Parent Score: 1

RE[2]: Comment by Drumhellar
by Drumhellar on Sat 10th Nov 2012 06:14 in reply to "RE: Comment by Drumhellar"
Drumhellar Member since:
2005-07-12

Well, considering most of the ads aren't even visible unless you scroll past ALL the content.

And, again, they only show up in the apps that have new content updated throughout the day.

The sports app is a good example. You launch it, it's a (nearly) full screen photo from a recent game that links to an article by (the one that popped up this time is from AP). On the right edge hints at more content.

Scroll over, there are 7 headlines, two with a photo, all captioned, and each from different news sources. Farther to the right you see the edge of a scroll box with 15 headlines.

Scroll the screen more are links to videos (6 are presented), plus links to slideshows (6 presented), plus the schedule for whichever sport, followed by a list of your favorite teams, and finally, an advertisement. There is no content beyond the ad. The "Today in Sports" section gives you 4 screens full without an ad, the Hockey section gives 6+.

Follow a link, you get page after page of stories, with a small add every 5 pages or so.

This is far less advertising than, say, when you spend $6 on a magazine.

It is also only these apps that are being constantly updated with new, licensed and copyrighted content that have these ads. The messaging app, mail, people, maps, camera, photo, or RDP apps have no ads.

You're hardly having these ads forced upon you.

Reply Parent Score: 2

UltraZelda64 Member since:
2006-12-05

Well, considering most of the ads aren't even visible unless you scroll past ALL the content.

Problem is, I already checked like a week ago in my test install of the RTM evaluation (I'm actually surprised it took so long to hit Slashdot and OSNews...), and it seems that the ad loads whether you scroll all the way over to the end or not. So no matter what you're adding to the ad views (and using your own bandwidth to do it) whether you actually read all the way to the end or not.

You're hardly having these ads forced upon you.

They certainly are forced upon your bandwidth, it seems. Anyway, the ability is now there. Now it'll just spiral until it gets worse and worse, and then it will get out of control. Like... gasp... subscription television services. I don't even remember what the of the ads that I saw were exactly (even if I did, I'd rather not say because it would only benefit these companies), but they were laughably obnoxious. I mean... come on... they're advertising a fucking laundry detergent, of all things, in a news applica..., er, I mean, app? Seriously? WTF?!?

Reply Parent Score: 6

RE[2]: Comment by Drumhellar
by lucas_maximus on Sat 10th Nov 2012 11:34 in reply to "RE: Comment by Drumhellar"
lucas_maximus Member since:
2009-08-18

Well, the ads are unobtrusive, and the apps they show up in are apps that have new content updated throughout the day, it doesn't bother me at all.

No ads are "unobtrusive" when you don't want to be force-fed these companies' shit, especially after you've paid a ridiculous amount of money for a piece of software. [/q]

You are aware there were adverts in ancient egypt.

Windows, that you have to pay hundreds for at retail, is adware. Who would've guessed? I think Lavasoft needs to push out a new version if they're still around that offers to wipe the disk clean if Windows 8 is installed because, after all, it's just a big, glorified, expensive example of what it's fighting.


Microsoft T & Cs in the app store is that you are allowed to define you own pricing architecture.

[q]Literally--for anything good that ever comes to Windows, there are dozens of major, major regressions.[\q]

No there isn't if the Application is built properly using the Windows APIs.

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE[3]: Comment by Drumhellar
by Yehppael on Sat 10th Nov 2012 13:06 in reply to "RE[2]: Comment by Drumhellar"
Yehppael Member since:
2012-08-01

It's not the money. Fact is, any kind of ads, unobtrusive or not, still work. They might not work as well as a billboard outside your window, but they will.

Found this article from a while back, remember it had lots of interesting stuff.

http://mindhacks.com/2009/03/04/psychology-and-advertising/

The true problem is, one, they'll make loads of money.
Two, people will get used to it to a certain degree.
Three, the system is in place, meaning, you'll see other applications using it, not just Windows built in.
Four, they'll be making loads of money, meaning that system works, so, that means, with this new revenue stream, they'll stop selling Windows and start selling ads.

Reply Parent Score: 2