Linked by Thom Holwerda on Tue 11th Dec 2012 23:09 UTC
Windows So, last night, Windows Phone 8 got its first update - specifically for the HTC 8X. In this day and age, where iOS is the gold standard and shows the industry how it ought to be done, and Android is the exact opposite, Windows Phone 7 was a bit of an in-between - every phone got every update, but the staggered rollout was slow and frustrating, often due to carrier meddling. How will Windows Phone 8 fare?
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RE: Nexus Line
by Nelson on Wed 12th Dec 2012 08:02 UTC in reply to "Nexus Line"
Nelson
Member since:
2005-11-29

That's not always true. People have waited months, despite owning a Nexus device, to have the latest version of Android pushed down to them. The fairy tale, because that's what it really is, a fairytale, that Nexus devices get updates on day #1 is getting old.

To contrast, when Windows Phone 7.5 came out, it rolled out to every device, across every carrier, in every country. Without a hitch.

Very little apps are impacted by the WiFi fix, because very little apps run under lockscreen, since 7.5 it hasn't been recommended to run under Lock screen. Instead, you just support Fast App Switching and Fast App Resume and call it a day.

About the only apps that I can see having a meaningful impact by this are apps that 1) Transmit data in the background like an Audio Streaming app, or 2) Apps that would like a persistent transport connection to be maintained.

Neither are very common. This is a low impact change, and it's opt-in, so it's not even default behavior. Its more to appease some power users.

Reply Parent Score: 1

RE[2]: Nexus Line
by Thom_Holwerda on Wed 12th Dec 2012 08:43 in reply to "RE: Nexus Line"
Thom_Holwerda Member since:
2005-06-29

To contrast, when Windows Phone 7.5 came out, it rolled out to every device, across every carrier, in every country. Without a hitch.


Speaking of fairtytales. You clearly weren't there during the rollout. It took months and months and months, with bugs and bricked devices. It wasn't until TWO WEEKS AGO that the Focus 2 on some carrier got it.

Two weeks ago.

Reply Parent Score: 3

RE[3]: Nexus Line
by Nelson on Wed 12th Dec 2012 09:09 in reply to "RE[2]: Nexus Line"
Nelson Member since:
2005-11-29

Wrong. Focus 2 came pre-loaded with Tango, a full release after Mango (7.5). It'd help if you knew what you were talking about.

http://www.samsung.com/us/mobile/cell-phones/SGH-I667UWAATT

The Focus 2 was not even out during the Mango roll out. The Focus 2 was released like four or five months after, during the Spring.

What the Focus 2 got late was a bunch of carrier and hardware specific firmware upgrades, and a small 7.5 Refresh update.

If the Focus 2 hadn't launched with Tango it wouldn't have had the 4G LTE stack that was added in the Spring update.

Edited 2012-12-12 09:15 UTC

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE[2]: Nexus Line
by darknexus on Wed 12th Dec 2012 08:44 in reply to "RE: Nexus Line"
darknexus Member since:
2008-07-15

To contrast, when Windows Phone 7.5 came out, it rolled out to every device, across every carrier, in every country. Without a hitch.


Yes, and then, when Windows 8 came out (not even a year after Windows Phone 7.5) every single consumer up to that point got screwed out of any future updates to those handsets, ever. Great comparison there. Try a little harder next time, okay?

Reply Parent Score: 3

RE[3]: Nexus Line
by Nelson on Wed 12th Dec 2012 09:10 in reply to "RE[2]: Nexus Line"
Nelson Member since:
2005-11-29

Except Windows Phone 7 handsets are getting an update in the form of Windows Phone 7.8.

So, what exactly were you saying again?

Reply Parent Score: 3

RE[3]: Nexus Line
by modmans2ndcoming on Thu 13th Dec 2012 00:27 in reply to "RE[2]: Nexus Line"
modmans2ndcoming Member since:
2005-11-09

How is hat different for the Gingerbread users on Android?

Every android handset other than the Nexus pones have (until ICE handsets were released) hardly, if ever, gotten updates and if they did, they got one crappy update that never got a bug fix.....why do you think CyanogenMOD became so freaking popular?

Edited 2012-12-13 00:31 UTC

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE[2]: Nexus Line
by Morgan on Wed 12th Dec 2012 11:41 in reply to "RE: Nexus Line"
Morgan Member since:
2005-06-29

The fairy tale, because that's what it really is, a fairytale, that Nexus devices get updates on day #1 is getting old.


Fairy tale, huh? From Wikipedia (and common knowledge to Nexus owners, of course), emphasis mine:

"On June 27, 2012 at the Google I/O conference, it was announced that the Nexus S would be one of the first devices to receive an upgrade to Android 4.1 Jelly Bean, along with the Motorola Xoom and Galaxy Nexus, began on July 26, 2012."

I finally gave up waiting for WP7.8 and went back to my Nexus S 4G. This is a phone that is well over a year old and yet received the Jelly Bean update soon after it was gold. My best friend's HTC One X, on the other hand, is still waiting several months later.

While my Nexus won't be getting 4.2 officially, my contract runs out right around the time the Galaxy Note 2 will likely drop in price. That device is already my chosen upgrade path so I'm set for a couple of years yet. And if I do want to get a taste of 4.2, there's always CyanogenMod. I'm also going to hang on to the phone to play around with Firefox OS builds.

As much as I enjoyed using Windows Phone, between the lack of updates and fixes for my old phone and Sprint's flippant attitude towards the platform, I had no choice but to leave it behind for the foreseeable future.

Reply Parent Score: 4

RE[3]: Nexus Line
by gan17 on Wed 12th Dec 2012 12:27 in reply to "RE[2]: Nexus Line"
gan17 Member since:
2008-06-03

"On June 27, 2012 at the Google I/O conference, it was announced that the Nexus S would be one of the first devices to receive an upgrade to Android 4.1 Jelly Bean, along with the Motorola Xoom and Galaxy Nexus, began on July 26, 2012."

Was there any small-print in that announcement for Galaxy Nexus owners? From what I've read, it took a long time for Verizon Galaxy Nexus owners in the US to get 4.1, and it's possible some folk haven't even got it yet. Same could be said for owners of the device in many countries. My unit wouldn't be up-to-date if I didn't manually flash the firmware back to Google's stock factory image. Not sure if this was the fault of Google, Samsung or the carriers of various nations, but it still stunk.

Reply Parent Score: 3

RE[3]: Nexus Line
by Nelson on Wed 12th Dec 2012 16:07 in reply to "RE[2]: Nexus Line"
Nelson Member since:
2005-11-29

"The fairy tale, because that's what it really is, a fairytale, that Nexus devices get updates on day #1 is getting old.


Fairy tale, huh? From Wikipedia (and common knowledge to Nexus owners, of course), emphasis mine:
"

You can emphasize anything you want, it doesn't inherently make you right. Because you're not.

Some Nexus device owners on some carriers faced an extraordinarily long wait to get their update. Saying that Nexus devices in and of themselves are guaranteed #1 day tickets to the latest Android is disingenuous.

Even more annoying, is the notion that you seemed compelled to respond to my comment with one of your own, despite not having yourself done the proper research. Please, don't do that.

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE[2]: Nexus Line
by pos3 on Wed 12th Dec 2012 13:24 in reply to "RE: Nexus Line"
pos3 Member since:
2010-06-25

Got nexus 7 recently. Few reboots later running latest version within hours.

Reply Parent Score: 1

RE[3]: Nexus Line
by Nelson on Wed 12th Dec 2012 16:08 in reply to "RE[2]: Nexus Line"
Nelson Member since:
2005-11-29

I know Android takes ages to start up, but a few reboots equals "hours"? Lol

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE[2]: Nexus Line
by aliquis on Wed 12th Dec 2012 18:12 in reply to "RE: Nexus Line"
aliquis Member since:
2005-07-23

Not sure if a joke or serious.

Reply Parent Score: 2