Linked by Thom Holwerda on Tue 22nd Jan 2013 21:28 UTC, submitted by lemur2
Linux "If you consider NetApplications' data set, then Linux owns only about 1 percent of the desktop OS market and Windows has almost 92 percent. But if you consider all computing platforms, including mobile, than Windows has only 20 percent and Linux has 42 percent - and that would be in the form of Google's Android alone." No more or less legitimate than claiming Windows owns 92% of the market. It's all a matter of perspective.
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RE: Comment by shmerl
by kurkosdr on Wed 23rd Jan 2013 10:45 UTC in reply to "Comment by shmerl"
kurkosdr
Member since:
2011-04-11

1% for the desktop is way invalid too.


It is. Google crawlbots and other web spiders running linux get filed under "Linux" in such statistics (not to mention set top boxes running some Linux-y OS). This grossly inflates the numbers. It will be fun if the real numbers for Desktop Linux are revealed and happen to be something like AmigaOS's numbers. All those Linux fans thinking the 1% was an acorn waiting to turn into an oak will cry in despair.

Desktop is the only market in which linux is deficient...

A kind offer by X.org and PulseAudio, and the geeks who imposed them on Desktop Linux users so they can boast "network transparency". Because THAT's what everbody cares about. X.org was at least the "standard" for nix OSes back then, but the PulseAudio nonsense was clear evidence the geeks behind Linux care more about bragging rights ("me has network transparency") than making usable stuff.

Edited 2013-01-23 10:51 UTC

Reply Parent Score: -1

RE[2]: Comment by shmerl
by kurkosdr on Wed 23rd Jan 2013 10:51 in reply to "RE: Comment by shmerl"
kurkosdr Member since:
2011-04-11

Sorry, most users and OEMs are willing to pay for not having to tolerate X.org (and PulseAudio, which is not "obligatory like X.org, but is gradually infesting more and more distros), and the upgrade breakages X.org and PulseAudio bring.

I will say it again: The Linux community doesn't get warranties.
When users by a PC, it comes with a warranty for the hardware and the software. Of course, the "warranty" for the software consists of little more than the OEM reformating the harddrive for you, but users don't care, as long as they don't have to do it, aka as long as somebody fixes it for them. So, no average user is going to throw away Windows and install Linux, and lose the software warranty and have to support themselves from that moment on.
OEMs on the other hand won't preinstall Linux because they are afraid of upgrade breakages every six months (courtesy of X.org and PulseAudio). I will keep saying Linux has LESS than 1% unless I see Ubuntu PCs popping up in US and EU stores (no, China dooesn't count, Ubuntu is sold with PCs in China so users can wipe the HDD clean and install pirated Windows and save a couple of bucks, and even there only geeks by them).

http://tmrepository.com/trademarks/marketshareisanmslie/

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE[3]: Comment by shmerl
by lemur2 on Wed 23rd Jan 2013 11:12 in reply to "RE[2]: Comment by shmerl"
lemur2 Member since:
2007-02-17

OEMs on the other hand won't preinstall Linux because they are afraid of upgrade breakages every six months (courtesy of X.org and PulseAudio).


I have updated my desktop Linux distribution every six months for over five years now, on many different machines, re-formatting the root partition but not the user home partition every time, with never a single breakage.

Besides:

http://arstechnica.com/information-technology/2013/01/ubuntu-consid...

Edited 2013-01-23 11:12 UTC

Reply Parent Score: 1

RE[3]: Comment by shmerl
by JAlexoid on Wed 23rd Jan 2013 14:19 in reply to "RE[2]: Comment by shmerl"
JAlexoid Member since:
2009-05-19

When users by a PC, it comes with a warranty for the hardware and the software.

A "warranty" that is the "software should work most of the time" is not really a warranty. There is no other warranty.

Reply Parent Score: 5

RE[3]: Comment by shmerl
by TemporalBeing on Wed 23rd Jan 2013 20:41 in reply to "RE[2]: Comment by shmerl"
TemporalBeing Member since:
2007-08-22

The Linux community doesn't get warranties.
When users by a PC, it comes with a warranty for the hardware and the software. Of course, the "warranty" for the software consists of little more than the OEM reformating the harddrive for you, but users don't care, as long as they don't have to do it, aka as long as somebody fixes it for them. So, no average user is going to throw away Windows and install Linux, and lose the software warranty and have to support themselves from that moment on.
OEMs on the other hand won't preinstall Linux because they are afraid of upgrade breakages every six months (courtesy of X.org and PulseAudio).


I'm pretty sure that my HP Laptop that came with SuSE Linux has a full hardware+software warranty on it. Mind you the software side might only cover SuSE's SLED that came on it, but it's still nonetheless a warranty for the software too.

No, I wouldn't expect them to support the Kubuntu install I put on there - especially since it's not an LTS version. Nor would I expect them to support Linux on my wife's HP laptop when it gets converted over (after she gets an upgrade); or for Dell to support my 2003 era D600 with Gentoo Linux (though it was out of warranty before I put Gentoo on there).

I would also say that Windows users don't tend to think about warranty's on their software either, though they do expect support for the general warranty period of the system from when they first received it.

All-in-all, I think you comment is rather off-topic and rather invalid or at least moot.

Reply Parent Score: 3

RE[2]: Comment by shmerl
by Lennie on Wed 23rd Jan 2013 11:20 in reply to "RE: Comment by shmerl"
Lennie Member since:
2007-09-22

Well they don't count that, they only count real user agents, the ones with real users.

It uses a small Javascript.

More likely they'll be under counting Linux users, a larger share of Linux users are more technical users. They know how to disable javascript (even if temporarily or per domain).

Reply Parent Score: 3

RE[2]: Comment by shmerl
by saso on Wed 23rd Jan 2013 14:57 in reply to "RE: Comment by shmerl"
saso Member since:
2007-04-18

but the PulseAudio nonsense was clear evidence the geeks behind Linux care more about bragging rights ("me has network transparency") than making usable stuff.

It's not network transparency that hurts PA, it's the shitty design and implementation. Network transparency done right degrades to a shmem implementation when local and works just as well as if it were designed that way from the start.

Reply Parent Score: 2