Linked by Thom Holwerda on Tue 2nd Apr 2013 11:17 UTC
Games A lot of interesting stuff on the internals of one of the greatest games of all time: Pac-Man. First, recreating Pac-Man in a day. Second, a very detailed look at the artificial intelligence of each of the game's ghosts. As it turns out, each ghost had its own 'character' and approached Pac-Man in its own unique way. Third, the Pac-Man Dossier, the most detailed study of the game ever.
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RE[3]: Been there...
by Kroc on Tue 2nd Apr 2013 18:24 UTC in reply to "RE[2]: Been there..."
Kroc
Member since:
2005-11-10

The key controls Q=Up, A=Down, O=Left and P=Right. It was common before WASD set in. It's better than WASD because it's comfortable and easy to have fingers on all of the keys.

Reply Parent Score: 1

RE[4]: Been there...
by deathshadow on Tue 2nd Apr 2013 20:46 in reply to "RE[3]: Been there..."
deathshadow Member since:
2005-07-12

Can't say I'm familiar with or come across that... was it specific to a certain platform? Sounds similar to the TRS-80 arrow key placements, which were a pain since you needed both hands for arrow leaving no hands free for anything else. Certainly not seen that one on any PC, TRS-80 or Commodore software. (Lemme guess, Apple?)

Most C64 software I ever dealt with was IJKM, didn't find out why until I wrote the '64 verions -- they're all on the same CIA port. WASD actually took two port reads.. QAOP would be four separate ports on CIA1. Similarly you did see WASZ on some C64 programs -- or even both WASZ and IJKM for multiplayer, as it too is on a single port read.

http://www.c64-wiki.com/index.php/Keyboard#Keyboard_Map

It's generally nicer when you only need to read one or two ports. Even more so when trying to mask the joystick so it doesn't register as keypresses.

Reply Parent Score: 2